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MSc. / MPhil

 

INTRODUCTION

The Department of Earth Science has over the years mounted graduate programmes in various areas of the geosciences.  During the process of running these programmes, it became apparent that there was a need for the Department to reorganize and revise them to meet current and contemporary challenges. The present extensive re-organization of the Department’s graduate programmes is to meet requests from industry and other end-users of our products and to accommodate global trends.  The key thrust in the revision of the programmes stems from the inability of some of the students to complete MPhil programmes they are registered for after the completion of the first year of course work while other students show lack of research capacity during the second year of research. 

 

The courses have been redesigned to reposition the Department to meet the challenges of the day, and also to allow students to window into specific areas of interests at the graduate level. The redesigning is also to introduce new codes to the courses to reflect the Department’s new name. The revised programmes are development-based aimed at strengthening the students in the chosen areas of specialization. The Department proposes two-phased graduate level courses for all graduate programmes. This means that a student interested in MPhil in any of our programmes must first complete a Master of Science (MSc) degree in that area before enrolling in MPhil. Thus, the Department will offer Master of Science (MSc) programmes by coursework, followed by research-based Master of Philosophy (MPhil). The widening of scope of the courses in the Department is to ensure diversification of our programmes beyond the scope of geology. The ultimate goal is to significantly increase intake of students taking courses in diverse areas in the earth sciences at the graduate level.

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENT

The entry point for all Master of Science programmes is a good Bachelors degree (with at least Second Class Lower Division equivalent). Students who wish to do the MSc programme will pursue a one year course work and a project and, graduate with MSc degree. However, MSc students in the Department who have completed the required coursework component with a minimum cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5 at the end of the second semester and wish to transfer directly to the MPhil programme in same field may be considered. Such students will not be required to write the Project. Instead, such students would be required to proceed to the thesis option which will be for one academic year.  Similarly, students who graduate with MSc degree may return later to be admitted to the thesis option, covering a one-year research work and graduate with MPhil degree provided they meet the conditions for such admission.

 

MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAMMES

Programme

Mode of Study

Tier

A Good degree in

MSc in Geology

Full time

3

Earth Sciences

MSc in Engineering Geology

Full time

3

Earth Sciences, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics

MSc in Hydrogeology

Full time

3

Earth Sciences, Physical Sciences

MSc in Applied Geochemistry

Full time

3

Earth Sciences, Chemistry

MSc in Applied Geophysics

Full time

2

Earth Sciences, Physics

MSc in Petroleum Geoscience

Full time

2

Earth Sciences, Physical Sciences

MSc in Economic Geology

Full time

2

Earth Sciences, Physical Sciences

MSc in Mineral Exploration

Full time

2

Earth Sciences, Physical Sciences

 

DURATION OF PROGRAMMES

The programmes are all full time and the normal duration for the completion of the graduate programme is 12 months

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

The following are the requirements for graduation in the MSc graduate programmes:

 

MSc Degree                           (12 months)

Coursework                             30-36 credits (15-18 credits per semester)

Seminar                                   3 credits

Project                                     6 credits

Total                                        39-45 credits

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

Course Codes

Code

Programme

EASC

Department-wide courses

GLGY

Geology courses

HYGL

Hydrogeology courses

AGPY

Applied Geophysics courses

AGCH

Applied Geochemistry courses

PGSC

Petroleum Geoscience courses

ECGL

Economic Geology

MEXP

Mineral Exploration courses

EGEO

Engineering Geology

 

MSc IN GEOLOGY

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

Total

9

Electives: Select 6 – 9 credits

GLGY 601

Igneous Petrology

3

GLGY 603

Advanced Mineralogy

3

GLGY 607

Clastic Sedimentology

3

GLGY 609

Advanced Stratigraphy

3

GLGY 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

GLGY 613

Clay Mineralogy

3

GLGY 615

Advanced Micropalaeontology

3

AGCH 601

Trace Element Geochemistry

3

AGCH 603

Isotope Geochemistry

3

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

GLGY 610

Analytical Techniques in Geology

3

Total

 

7

Electives: Select 9 – 12 credits

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

GLGY 602

Metamorphic Petrology

3

GLGY 604

Advanced Geotectonics

3

GLGY 606

 Carbonate Sedimentology

3

GLGY 608

Palynology

3

AGCH 602

Solid Earth Geochemistry

3

ECGL 604

Ore Mineralogy

3

AGCH 604

Advanced Environmental Geochemistry

3



 

MSc IN HYDROGEOLOGY

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

HYGL 601

Advanced Hydrogeology

3

Total

9

Electives: Select 6 – 9 credits

HYGL 603

Applied Hydrology

3

HYGL 605

Catchment Hydrology

3

GLGY 610

Analytical Techniques in Geology

3

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

AGCH 603

Isotope Geochemistry

3

AGPY 603

Borehole Geophysics

3

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

1EASC 620

Geological Concepts

3

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

AGPY 604

Applied Geophysics in Site Investigations

3

Total

 

7 – 10

Electives: Select 6 – 9 credits

HYGL 602

Geochemistry of Natural Water Systems

3

HYGL 604

Contaminant Hydrology

3

HYGL 606

Applied Groundwater Modelling

3

HYGL 608

Petroleum Hydrology

3

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

1For only students with weak geology background

 

MSc IN APPLIED GEOPHYSICS

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

AGPY 601

Near-Surface Geophysics

3

Total

9

Electives: Select 6 – 9 credits

AGPY 603

Borehole Geophysics

3

AGPY 605

Airborne Geophysics

3

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

GLGY 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

PGSC 607

Seismic Reflection Acquisition and Processing

3

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

1EASC 620

Geological Concepts

3

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

AGPY 602

Gravity and Magnetic Methods

3

Total

 

4 – 7

Electives: Select 9 – 12 credits

AGPY 604

Applied Geophysics in Site Investigations

3

AGPY 606

Earthquake Seismology

3

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

PGSC 612

Seismic Reflection Interpretation

3

1For only students with weak geology background

 

 

MSc IN APPLIED GEOCHEMISTRY

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

AGCH 601

Trace Element Geochemistry

3

AGCH 603

Isotope Geochemistry

3

Total

12

Electives: Select 3 – 6 credits

AGCH 605

Medical Geochemistry

3

MEXP 601

Advanced Exploration Geochemistry

3

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

 

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

GLGY 610

Analytical Techniques in Geology

3

1EASC 620

Geological Concepts

3

EASC 630

Geological Fieldwork

1

AGCH 602

Solid Earth Geochemistry

3

Total

 

10 - 13

Electives: Select 3 – 9 credits

AGCH 604

Advanced Environmental Geochemistry

3

HYGL 602

Geochemistry of Natural Water Systems

3

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

PGSC 618

Petroleum Geochemistry

3

1For only students with weak geology background

 

MSc IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

EGEO 601

Advanced Soil and Rock Mechanics

3

EGEO 603

Laboratory and Field Techniques in Engineering Geology

3

Total

12

Electives: Select 3 – 6 credits

HYGL 601

Advanced Hydrogeology

3

EGEO 605

Petroleum Geomechanics

3

GLGY 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

1EASC 620

Geological Concepts

3

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

EGEO 602

Applied Engineering Geology

3

Total

 

10 – 13

Electives: Select 3 – 6 credits

EGEO 604

Disaster Risk Assessment and Management

3

AGPY 603

Applied Geophysics in Site Investigations

3

AGPY 606

Earthquake Seismology

3

1For only students with weak geology background

 

MSc IN MINERAL EXPLORATION

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

1EASC 620

Geological Concepts

3

MEXP 601

Mineral Resource Economics, Policies and Management

3

Total

9 - 12

Electives: Select 3 – 9 credits

AGPY 601

Near-Surface Geophysics

3

AGPY 605

Airborne Geophysics

3

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

GLGY 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

MEXP 603

Advanced Exploration Geochemistry

3

1For only students with little or no Geology background

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

MEXP 602

Environmental and Social Issues in Mining

3

Total

 

10

Electives: Select 6 – 9 credits

AGPY 602

Gravity and Magnetic Methods

3

AGPY 604

Borehole Geophysics

3

MEXP 604

Exploration Geology

3

AGCH 604

Advanced Environmental Geochemistry

3

GLGY 610

Analytical Techniques in Geology

3

 

 

MSc IN ECONOMIC GEOLOGY

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

1EASC 620

Geological Concepts

3

MEXP 601

Mineral Resource Economics, Policies and Management

3

Total

9 - 12

Electives: select 3 – 9 credits

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

ECGL 601

Industrial Mineral Deposits

3

ECGL 603

Magmatic and Hydrothermal Ore Deposits

3

GEOL 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

1For only students with little or no Geology background

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

MEXP 604

Exploration Geology

3

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

MEXP 602

Environmental and Social Issues in Mining

3

Total

 

10

Electives: Select 6 - 9 credits

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

ECGL 602

Sedimentary Ore Deposits

3

ECGL 604

Ore Mineralogy

3

GLGY610

Analytical Techniques in Geology

3

 

MSc IN PETROLEUM GEOSCIENCE

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

1PGSC 601

Basic Petroleum Geology

3

PGSC 603

Sedimentary Basins and Tectonics

3

PGSC 605

Foundations of Petrophysics

3

Total

9 -12

Electives: Select one option

Geophysics Option (select 3 – 9 credits)

PGSC 607

Seismic Reflection Acquisition and Processing

3

PGSC 609

Seismic and Sequence Stratigraphy

3

EGEO 603

Petroleum Geomechanics

3

AGPY 605

Airborne Geophysics

3

GLGY 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

 

Geology Option (select 3 – 9 credits)

PGSC 607

Seismic and Sequence Stratigraphy

3

GLGY 613

Clay Mineralogy

3

GLGY 607

Clastic Sedimentology

3

GLGY 609

Advanced Stratigraphy

3

GLGY 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

GLGY 615

Advanced Micropalaeontology

3

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

PGSC 602

Basic Economics and Legal Framework of Petroleum Industry

3

PGSC 604

Health, Safety and Environment

2

PGSC 606

Reservoir Characterization and Modeling

3

PGSC 608

Well Log Interpretation

3

Total

 

12

Electives: Select one option

Geophysics Option (select 3 – 6 credits)

PGSC 612

Seismic Reflection Interpretation

3

AGPY 602

Gravity and Magnetic Methods

3

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

 

Geology Option (select 3 – 6 credits)

PGSC 616

Reservoir Petrology

3

PGSC 618

Petroleum Geochemistry

3

GLGY 606

Carbonate Sedimentology

3

GLGY 608

Palynology

3

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

1For only students with weak geology background

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

DEPARTMENT-WIDE COURSES

 

EASC 600: Project

Students undertake an independent project which is the culmination of the MSc degree programme, and provides students with the opportunity to further their specialist knowledge in a particular area. The dissertation is undertaken under the supervision of faculty. The Project may commonly include a fieldwork component or may entirely consist of the analysis of raw data from industry. The project will normally begin after the second semester examination, from early May until end of July. However, depending on the programme being pursued by the student the project may start by the beginning of the second semester.

 

EASC 610: Seminar I

This course is intended to provide students planning a research career in Earth Science with the opportunity to develop the skill of critically reading and evaluating research papers. The course is open to all students, and is a required component of the MSc programme. The course will consist of a weekly timetabled session in which students will read, present and discuss influential research papers across a broad range of subject areas.

 

EASC 661: Geoscience Professional Practice

The objective of this course is to improve the writing and communication skills of students and prepare them for a career in the geoscience profession. Course content: Preparation of geological reports, project proposals and oral presentations. Mining/minerals and petroleum laws and regulation. Corporate structure and management. Exploration management and quality assurance of geological data. Professional ethics. Professional organizations and societies. Professional development and training. Best practice guidelines in the geosciences. In addition, students will learn how to search and apply for job, and how to perform well at interviews. There will be occasional lectures to be delivered by professionals from industry.

 

Reading list

 Andrews, G.C. (2008). Canadian professional engineering and geoscience: Practice and Ethics. Canada: Nelson College Indigenous

Buchanan, R., Adkins-Heljeson, M. & Bates, R. (2011). Geowriting. Virginia: American Geological Institute.

Hofmann, A.H. (2009). Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and Presentations. USA: Oxford University Press.

Morales, G. (2012). How to land a top-paying geoscience professors job. USA: Tebbo (April 8, 2012)

Rosen, S. & Paul, C. (1997). Career renewal: Tools for scientists and technical professionals. London: Academic Press.

Samuels, B.M. & Sanders, D. (2010). Practical law of architecture, engineering, and geoscience. Canada: Prentice-Hall

 

 

EASC 662: Geostatistics

This course deals with the application of geostatistics in the evaluation of natural resources. The different spatial analytical tools will be taught in detail with specific examples from the Ghanaian environment. Topics to be treated include basic statistics, assessment of data accuracy and validity, simple spatial prediction methods, variography, ordinary kriging, co-kriging, kriging with external drift, disjunctive kriging, indicator kriging, and conditional simulation. Much emphasis will be placed on the practical aspects of the course. As such, the final assessment of the course will be based on the successful completion of mini projects which will involve the analyses and interpretation of geospatial datasets from the local Ghanaian environment.

 

Reading list

Devore J., Farnum, N. (1999). Applied statistics for engineers and scientists. USA: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company

Goovaerts, P. (1997).  Geostatistics for natural resources evaluation (Applied Geostatistics series). USA: Oxford University Press

Johnson, R.A., Wichern, D.W., (1998). Applied multivariate statistical analysis. USA: Prentice Hall

Meyers, L. S., Gamst, G., & Guarino, A.J. (2005). Applied multivariate research: Design and interpretation. London: SAGE Publications.

Shumway, R.H. & Stoffer, D.S. (2010). Time series analysis and its applications. New York: Springer.

Warner, R. M. (2007). Applied statistics: From bivariate through multivariate techniques. USA: SAGE Publications

Webster, R., & Oliver, M.A., (2007). Geostatistics for environmental scientists. England: John Wiley & Sons.

 

EASC 663: GIS Applications in Earth Science

This course will provide both theory and practical hands-on approach to spatial database design and spatial data analysis with Geographical Information Systems (GIS) as applied to groundwater investigations, mineral exploration, and petroleum exploration. The platform used will be ArcGIS, MapInfo, and Microsoft Excel, but the techniques developed will be applicable to other software. Laboratory work and field exercises provide hands-on experience with collection, mapping and analysis of geologic and other field data using GPS equipment and GIS software.

 

Reading List

Carranza, E. J. M. (2008). Geochemical anomaly and mineral prospectivity mapping in gis, volume 11 (handbook of exploration and environmental geochemistry). Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Coburn, T.C. & Yarus, J.M. (Eds.) (2000). Geographic information systems in petroleum exploration and development. USA: american association of petroleum geologists.

Legg, C. (1995). remote sensing and geographic information systems: geological mapping, mineral exploration and mining (wiley-praxis series in remote sensing). John Wiley & Sons Inc

Lunetta, R. S. & Lyon, J. G. (2004). Remote sensing and GIS accuracy assessment (mapping science). Florida: CRC Press.

Strassberg, G., Jones, N.L. & Maidment, D.R. (2011). Arc hydro groundwater: GIS for hydrogeology. USA: ESRI Press

 

EASC 664: Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

The course covers the application of remote sensing to groundwater investigations, mineral exploration, and petroleum exploration. The course covers aerial photography and satellite image interpretations using multispectral, thermal infrared, and radar images. The course includes three hour weekly practical sessions designed to take the student through photogrammetry, aerial photo interpretation, and geological interpretation of satellite images.

 

Reading List

Avery, T. E. & Berlin, G. L. (1992). Fundamentals of remote sensing and airphoto interpretation. NY: Macmillan Publishing Company

Clark, P. E. & Rilee, M. L. (2010). Remote sensing tools for exploration: Observing and interpreting the electromagnetic spectrum. New York: Springer.

Legg, C. (1995). Remote sensing and geographic information systems: Geological mapping, mineral exploration and mining (Wiley-Praxis Series in Remote Sensing). UK: John Wiley & Sons Inc

Lunetta, R. S. & Lyon, J. G. (2004). Remote sensing and GIS accuracy assessment (Mapping science). CRC press.

McCoy, R. M. (2004). Field methods in remote sensing. New York: The Guilford Press

 

EASC 620: Geological Concepts

This course is in two parts. The first part introduces basic concepts in geology, mineralogy, petrography and geological processes. The latter encompasses earth structure, geological time, stratigraphy, deformation of rocks, the geological cycle and plate tectonics. Other topics include weathering, erosion, soil formation and the development of landforms. The second part involves an introduction to map reading and navigation skills using topographic maps, aerial photographs, a compass and global positioning system, as well as identification of common rock types in the field, how to collect and interpret basic structural data and how to prepare a basic geological map.

 

Reading List

Coe, A.L.  (2009). Geological field techniques.  UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Jerram, D. & Petford, N. (2011). Field description of igneous rocks (Geological field guide). Wiley.

Lisle, R.J. & Leyshon P.R. (2004). Stereographic projection techniques for geologists and civil engineers. UK: Cambridge University Press

Lisle, R.J., Brabham, P., &  Barnes, J.W. (2011). Basic geological mapping (Geological field guide). Wiley.

Pough, F.H., Peterson, R.T. & Scovil, J. (1998). A field guide to rocks and minerals (Peterson field guides). Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

 

EASC 630: Geoscience Fieldwork

Fieldwork is an integral part of Earth Science training, and it is used to consolidate students' understanding by illustrating classroom-taught concepts in the field. The course focuses on geological mapping, geophysical surveying or environmental fieldwork depending on which degree programme the student is following. Students study and collect geological data in the field. Geophysics students may however use that time undertaking valuable training in a variety of measuring techniques. A total of seven days are spent in the field under faculty supervision.

 

Reading List

Assaad, F.A., LaMoreaux, J.W., & Hughes, T (Eds.) (2004). Field methods for geologists and hydrogeologists. Springer.

Assad, F.A. (2009). Field methods for petroleum geologists: A guide to computerized lithostratigraphic correlation charts case study: Northern Africa. Springer.

Coe, A.L. (Ed.). (2010). Geological field techniques. Wiley-Blackwell

Compton, R.R. (1985). Geology in the field. Wiley.

Freeman, T. (1999). Procedures in field geology. Wiley-Blackwell.

McCoy, R.M. (2004). Field methods in remote sensing. The Guilford Press.

Milsom, J.J. & Eriksen, A. (2011). Field geophysics (Geological field guide). Wiley.

 

 

MSc PETROLEUM GEOSCIENCE COURSES

 

PGSC 601: Petroleum Geology

This course explains background to selected geological principles and processes, and describe how certain petroleum reservoirs and source rocks are formed. It also covers the fundamentals of drilling, well completions and production operations. Course content include: minerals and rocks; plate tectonics; geological time; surface geological processes; diagenesis; reservoirs; structural geology and petroleum; origin, migration, and trapping of petroleum; reservoir fluid properties; exploration and drilling technology; well completion and workover; and production operations; offshore operations.

 

Reading List

Glennie, K. (1998). Petroleum geology of the north sea: Basic concepts and recent advances. Wiley-Blackwell

Hyne, N.J.  (2001). Nontechnical guide to petroleum geology, exploration, drilling and production. Pennwell Books

Kesse, G.O. (1985). The mineral and rock resources of Ghana. Taylor & Francis.

Link, P.K. (2007). Basic petroleum geology. Oil & Gas Consultants International

Selley, R.C. (1997). Elements of petroleum geology. Academic Press.

Stoneley, R. (1995). Introduction to petroleum exploration for non-geologists. USA: Oxford University Press.

 

PGSC 602: Economics and Legal Framework of Petroleum Industry

This course covers the basic economics in the petroleum life cycle and the fundamentals of international oil and gas law. Students study cash flow techniques for economic evaluations and investigate frequently encountered situations. Students also learn how to choose the best investments and how to properly evaluate investment opportunities. They will also be introduced to the philosophy, evolution, and fundamentals of international petroleum contracts. They will be given a basic understanding of the legal fundamentals that make international transactions work.

Reading List

Appiah-Adu, K. (2013) (Ed.). Governance of the petroleum sector in an emerging developing economy. Gower Pub Co

Conaway, C.F. (1999). The petroleum industry: A nontechnical guide. Pennwell Books.

Falola, T. & Genova, A (2005). The politics of the global oil industry: An introduction. Praeger.

Johnston, D & Johnston, D (2005). Introduction to oil company financial analysis. PennWell Corp.

Speight, J.G. (2011). An introduction to petroleum technology, economics, and politics. Wiley-Scrivener

Taverne, B (1994). An introduction to the regulation of the petroleum industry: Laws, contracts and conventions (international energy & resources law & policy). Springer

Van Vactor, S.A. (2010). Introduction to the global oil & gas business. PennWell Corp.

 

PGSC 603: Sedimentary Basins and Tectonics

This course is divided into three parts. Part I deals with basin tectonics. It first examines how basins are formed and how they are linked to the Earth’s thermal behaviour and plate tectonics. It then describes the mechanisms of crustal and lithospheric thinning. Then the structures associated with the termination of basin formation and the deformation of their contents are described and discussed. Part II deals with the methods used to carry out basin analysis and the applications of basin analysis in the interpretation of geologic history and the identification of fossil fuels. Part III deals with the geology and hydrocarbon potential of the sedimentary basins of Ghana.

 

Reading List

Allen, P.A. & Allen, J.R. (2013). Basin analysis: Principles and application to petroleum play assessment. Blackwell Publishing

Busby, C & Pérez, A.A. (2012). Tectonics of sedimentary basins: Recent advances. Wiley-Blackwell.

Kleinspehn, K.L. & Paola, C. (1988). New perspectives in basin analysis (Frontiers in sedimentary geology). Springer

Leeder, M.R. (2011). Sedimentology and sedimentary basins: From turbulence to tectonics. Wiley-Blackwell.

Miall, A.D. (2010). Principles of sedimentary basin analysis. Springer.

 

PGSC 604: Health Safety and Environment

The course covers the basics of Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) and HES management related to the petroleum industry. Course content includes: Environmental risk management and assessment; emission limits and control; Environmental monitoring and data management; Spill response; Site assessment, management and remediation; Health risk and impact assessment; Food and water hygiene; Medical surveillance/ Industrial hygiene; Safety techniques for hazard and effect management; Process safety and hazards control; Hazard communication; Fire, tool and electrical safety; Noise and vibration; Radiation and radioactive sources; Construction and demolition; Excavation; Risk assessment and management; Planning and procedures; Emergency response; Performance management; Incident reporting & investigation; Audit; Management review.

 

Reading List

Asbury, S. (2007). Health & safety, environment and quality audits. Routledge

Cahill, L.B. & Kane, R.W. (2011). Environmental health and safety audits. Government Institutes.

Center for the Advancement of Process Tech (2009). Safety, health, and environment. Prentice Hall.

Speegle, M. (2012). Safety, health, and environmental concepts for the process industry. Cengage Learning.

Taylor, B. (2005). Effective environmental, health, and safety management using the team approach. Wiley-Interscience.

Thomas, C.E. (2011). Process technology: Safety, health, and environment. Cengage Learning.

 

PGSC 605: Fundamentals of Petrophysics

This course discusses the principles, applications, and integration of petrophysical information for reservoir description. The course begins by considering the nature of the borehole environment, and the way in which the drilling process may alter the properties of rocks and their contained fluids. Next, the general principles of physics are developed to explain the functioning of modern logging tools. Then it covers the basic operations of mudlogging, including the analysis of drill cuttings. Finally it discusses the physical principles behind, and the operation of the major well logging tools.

 

Reading List

Asquith, G.B. (2012). Fundamentals of petrophysical well-log interpretation: A course-note collection with commentary. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Buryakovsky, L. Chilingar, G.V., Rieke, H.H. & Shin, S. (2012). Fundamentals of the petrophysics of oil and gas reservoirs. New Jersey: Wiley-Scrivener.

Donaldson, E.C. & Tiab, D. (2003). Petrophysics: Theory and Practice of Measuring Reservoir Rock and Fluid Transport Properties. USA: Gulf Professional Publishing

Schön, J.H. (2004). Physical properties of rocks, volume 8: Fundamentals and principles of petrophysics (Handbook of petroleum exploration and production). Pergamon.

Zinszner, B & Pellerin, F. (2007). A geoscientist's guide to petrophysics. Editions Technip.  

 

PGSC 606: Reservoir Characterization and Modeling

This course integrates standard petroleum reservoir data (rock facies, seismic, petrophysics and structural geology) with up-to-date industry modeling software. It introduces the basic concepts of soft computing techniques applied to reservoir characterization. Some advanced statistical and hybrid models are also presented. The specific applications include different reservoir characterization topics such as prediction of petrophysical properties from well logs and seismic attributes. Students integrate well log, core, thin section, seismic reflection, and other datasets to characterize and develop geologically realistic, predictive computer model of reservoirs. Integrated software systems that incorporate mapping and petroleum systems and play analysis tools will be taught.

 

 

 

 

Reading List

Chambers, R., Hird, K., Tillman, R. & Yarus, J. (2001). applied reservoir characterization using geostatistics: The value of spatial modeling (Proceedings volume, AAPG Hedberg research conference). American assoc. of petroleum geologists.

Deutsch, C.V. (2002). Geostatistical reservoir modeling. USA: Oxford University Press

Harris, P.M. (Ed.) (2006). Giant hydrocarbon reservoirs of the world: From rocks to reservoir characterization and modeling. Society for sedimentary geology.

Nikravesh,M.,  Zadeh, L.A. & Korotkikh, V. (2010). Fuzzy partial differential equations and relational equations: Reservoir Characterization and Modeling (Studies in fuzziness and soft computing). Springer.

Rahman, J., Mondol, N.H. & Jahren, J. (2012). Reservoir characterization: Using geophysical techniques (Compaction, rock physics analysis, AVO modeling and seismic inversion). LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing

Stoudt, E.L. & Harris, P.M. (1995). Hydrocarbon reservoir characterization: Geologic framework and flow unit modeling (SEPM short course notes ; No. 34). SEPM Society for sedimentary geology.

Wong, P., Aminzadeh, F. & Nikravesh, M. (2011). Soft computing for reservoir characterization and modeling (Studies in fuzziness and soft computing). Physica.

 

PGSC 607: Seismic Reflection Acquisition and Processing

This course is designed to give students an understanding in the standard methods used in acquiring and processing seismic reflection data. The course begins with a brief review of elastic waves and phenomena such as reflection, refraction, diffraction and attenuation which occur as these waves propagate through the earth. The acquisition component outlines the equipment used; survey design; typical acquisition procedures for land and marine surveys; and auxiliary information such as uphole and shallow refraction surveys. The pro