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MSc. MPhil

 

INTRODUCTION

The Department of Earth Science has over the years mounted graduate programmes in various areas of the geosciences.  During the process of running these programmes, it became apparent that there was a need for the Department to reorganize and revise them to meet current and contemporary challenges. The present extensive re-organization of the Department’s graduate programmes is to meet requests from industry and other end-users of our products and to accommodate global trends.  The key thrust in the revision of the programmes stems from the inability of some of the students to complete MPhil programmes they are registered for after the completion of the first year of course work while other students show lack of research capacity during the second year of research. 

 

The courses have been redesigned to reposition the Department to meet the challenges of the day, and also to allow students to window into specific areas of interests at the graduate level. The redesigning is also to introduce new codes to the courses to reflect the Department’s new name. The revised programmes are development-based aimed at strengthening the students in the chosen areas of specialization. The Department proposes two-phased graduate level courses for all graduate programmes. This means that a student interested in MPhil in any of our programmes must first complete a Master of Science (MSc) degree in that area before enrolling in MPhil. Thus, the Department will offer Master of Science (MSc) programmes by coursework, followed by research-based Master of Philosophy (MPhil). The widening of scope of the courses in the Department is to ensure diversification of our programmes beyond the scope of geology. The ultimate goal is to significantly increase intake of students taking courses in diverse areas in the earth sciences at the graduate level.

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENT

The entry point for all Master of Science programmes is a good Bachelors degree (with at least Second Class Lower Division equivalent). Students who wish to do the MSc programme will pursue a one year course work and a project and, graduate with MSc degree. However, MSc students in the Department who have completed the required coursework component with a minimum cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5 at the end of the second semester and wish to transfer directly to the MPhil programme in same field may be considered. Such students will not be required to write the Project. Instead, such students would be required to proceed to the thesis option which will be for one academic year.  Similarly, students who graduate with MSc degree may return later to be admitted to the thesis option, covering a one-year research work and graduate with MPhil degree provided they meet the conditions for such admission.

 

MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAMMES

Programme

Mode of Study

Tier

A Good degree in

MSc in Geology

Full time

3

Earth Sciences

MSc in Engineering Geology

Full time

3

Earth Sciences, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics

MSc in Hydrogeology

Full time

3

Earth Sciences, Physical Sciences

MSc in Applied Geochemistry

Full time

3

Earth Sciences, Chemistry

MSc in Applied Geophysics

Full time

2

Earth Sciences, Physics

MSc in Petroleum Geoscience

Full time

2

Earth Sciences, Physical Sciences

MSc in Economic Geology

Full time

2

Earth Sciences, Physical Sciences

MSc in Mineral Exploration

Full time

2

Earth Sciences, Physical Sciences

 

DURATION OF PROGRAMMES

The programmes are all full time and the normal duration for the completion of the graduate programme is 12 months

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

The following are the requirements for graduation in the MSc graduate programmes:

 

MSc Degree                           (12 months)

Coursework                             30-36 credits (15-18 credits per semester)

Seminar                                   3 credits

Project                                     6 credits

Total                                        39-45 credits

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

Course Codes

Code

Programme

EASC

Department-wide courses

GLGY

Geology courses

HYGL

Hydrogeology courses

AGPY

Applied Geophysics courses

AGCH

Applied Geochemistry courses

PGSC

Petroleum Geoscience courses

ECGL

Economic Geology

MEXP

Mineral Exploration courses

EGEO

Engineering Geology

 

MSc IN GEOLOGY

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

Total

9

Electives: Select 6 – 9 credits

GLGY 601

Igneous Petrology

3

GLGY 603

Advanced Mineralogy

3

GLGY 607

Clastic Sedimentology

3

GLGY 609

Advanced Stratigraphy

3

GLGY 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

GLGY 613

Clay Mineralogy

3

GLGY 615

Advanced Micropalaeontology

3

AGCH 601

Trace Element Geochemistry

3

AGCH 603

Isotope Geochemistry

3

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

GLGY 610

Analytical Techniques in Geology

3

Total

 

7

Electives: Select 9 – 12 credits

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

GLGY 602

Metamorphic Petrology

3

GLGY 604

Advanced Geotectonics

3

GLGY 606

 Carbonate Sedimentology

3

GLGY 608

Palynology

3

AGCH 602

Solid Earth Geochemistry

3

ECGL 604

Ore Mineralogy

3

AGCH 604

Advanced Environmental Geochemistry

3


 

MSc IN HYDROGEOLOGY

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

HYGL 601

Advanced Hydrogeology

3

Total

9

Electives: Select 6 – 9 credits

HYGL 603

Applied Hydrology

3

HYGL 605

Catchment Hydrology

3

GLGY 610

Analytical Techniques in Geology

3

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

AGCH 603

Isotope Geochemistry

3

AGPY 603

Borehole Geophysics

3

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

1EASC 620

Geological Concepts

3

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

AGPY 604

Applied Geophysics in Site Investigations

3

Total

 

7 – 10

Electives: Select 6 – 9 credits

HYGL 602

Geochemistry of Natural Water Systems

3

HYGL 604

Contaminant Hydrology

3

HYGL 606

Applied Groundwater Modelling

3

HYGL 608

Petroleum Hydrology

3

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

1For only students with weak geology background

 

MSc IN APPLIED GEOPHYSICS

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

AGPY 601

Near-Surface Geophysics

3

Total

9

Electives: Select 6 – 9 credits

AGPY 603

Borehole Geophysics

3

AGPY 605

Airborne Geophysics

3

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

GLGY 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

PGSC 607

Seismic Reflection Acquisition and Processing

3

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

1EASC 620

Geological Concepts

3

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

AGPY 602

Gravity and Magnetic Methods

3

Total

 

4 – 7

Electives: Select 9 – 12 credits

AGPY 604

Applied Geophysics in Site Investigations

3

AGPY 606

Earthquake Seismology

3

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

PGSC 612

Seismic Reflection Interpretation

3

1For only students with weak geology background

 

 

MSc IN APPLIED GEOCHEMISTRY

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

AGCH 601

Trace Element Geochemistry

3

AGCH 603

Isotope Geochemistry

3

Total

12

Electives: Select 3 – 6 credits

AGCH 605

Medical Geochemistry

3

MEXP 601

Advanced Exploration Geochemistry

3

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

 

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

GLGY 610

Analytical Techniques in Geology

3

1EASC 620

Geological Concepts

3

EASC 630

Geological Fieldwork

1

AGCH 602

Solid Earth Geochemistry

3

Total

 

10 - 13

Electives: Select 3 – 9 credits

AGCH 604

Advanced Environmental Geochemistry

3

HYGL 602

Geochemistry of Natural Water Systems

3

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

PGSC 618

Petroleum Geochemistry

3

1For only students with weak geology background

 

MSc IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

EGEO 601

Advanced Soil and Rock Mechanics

3

EGEO 603

Laboratory and Field Techniques in Engineering Geology

3

Total

12

Electives: Select 3 – 6 credits

HYGL 601

Advanced Hydrogeology

3

EGEO 605

Petroleum Geomechanics

3

GLGY 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

1EASC 620

Geological Concepts

3

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

EGEO 602

Applied Engineering Geology

3

Total

 

10 – 13

Electives: Select 3 – 6 credits

EGEO 604

Disaster Risk Assessment and Management

3

AGPY 603

Applied Geophysics in Site Investigations

3

AGPY 606

Earthquake Seismology

3

1For only students with weak geology background

 

MSc IN MINERAL EXPLORATION

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

1EASC 620

Geological Concepts

3

MEXP 601

Mineral Resource Economics, Policies and Management

3

Total

9 - 12

Electives: Select 3 – 9 credits

AGPY 601

Near-Surface Geophysics

3

AGPY 605

Airborne Geophysics

3

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

GLGY 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

MEXP 603

Advanced Exploration Geochemistry

3

1For only students with little or no Geology background

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

MEXP 602

Environmental and Social Issues in Mining

3

Total

 

10

Electives: Select 6 – 9 credits

AGPY 602

Gravity and Magnetic Methods

3

AGPY 604

Borehole Geophysics

3

MEXP 604

Exploration Geology

3

AGCH 604

Advanced Environmental Geochemistry

3

GLGY 610

Analytical Techniques in Geology

3

 

 

MSc IN ECONOMIC GEOLOGY

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

EASC 663

GIS Applications in Earth Science

3

1EASC 620

Geological Concepts

3

MEXP 601

Mineral Resource Economics, Policies and Management

3

Total

9 - 12

Electives: select 3 – 9 credits

GLGY 605

Regional Geology

3

ECGL 601

Industrial Mineral Deposits

3

ECGL 603

Magmatic and Hydrothermal Ore Deposits

3

GEOL 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

1For only students with little or no Geology background

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

MEXP 604

Exploration Geology

3

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

MEXP 602

Environmental and Social Issues in Mining

3

Total

 

10

Electives: Select 6 - 9 credits

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

ECGL 602

Sedimentary Ore Deposits

3

ECGL 604

Ore Mineralogy

3

GLGY610

Analytical Techniques in Geology

3

 

MSc IN PETROLEUM GEOSCIENCE

 

Code

Title

Credits

EASC 600

Project

6

EASC 610

Seminar I

3

 

FIRST SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 661

Geoscience Professional Practice

3

1PGSC 601

Basic Petroleum Geology

3

PGSC 603

Sedimentary Basins and Tectonics

3

PGSC 605

Foundations of Petrophysics

3

Total

9 -12

Electives: Select one option

Geophysics Option (select 3 – 9 credits)

PGSC 607

Seismic Reflection Acquisition and Processing

3

PGSC 609

Seismic and Sequence Stratigraphy

3

EGEO 603

Petroleum Geomechanics

3

AGPY 605

Airborne Geophysics

3

GLGY 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

 

Geology Option (select 3 – 9 credits)

PGSC 607

Seismic and Sequence Stratigraphy

3

GLGY 613

Clay Mineralogy

3

GLGY 607

Clastic Sedimentology

3

GLGY 609

Advanced Stratigraphy

3

GLGY 611

Advanced Structural Geology

3

GLGY 615

Advanced Micropalaeontology

3

 

SECOND SEMESTER

Code

Title

Credits

Core

EASC 630

Geoscience Fieldwork

1

PGSC 602

Basic Economics and Legal Framework of Petroleum Industry

3

PGSC 604

Health, Safety and Environment

2

PGSC 606

Reservoir Characterization and Modeling

3

PGSC 608

Well Log Interpretation

3

Total

 

12

Electives: Select one option

Geophysics Option (select 3 – 6 credits)

PGSC 612

Seismic Reflection Interpretation

3

AGPY 602

Gravity and Magnetic Methods

3

EASC 664

Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

3

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

 

Geology Option (select 3 – 6 credits)

PGSC 616

Reservoir Petrology

3

PGSC 618

Petroleum Geochemistry

3

GLGY 606

Carbonate Sedimentology

3

GLGY 608

Palynology

3

EASC 662

Geostatistics

3

1For only students with weak geology background

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

DEPARTMENT-WIDE COURSES

 

EASC 600: Project

Students undertake an independent project which is the culmination of the MSc degree programme, and provides students with the opportunity to further their specialist knowledge in a particular area. The dissertation is undertaken under the supervision of faculty. The Project may commonly include a fieldwork component or may entirely consist of the analysis of raw data from industry. The project will normally begin after the second semester examination, from early May until end of July. However, depending on the programme being pursued by the student the project may start by the beginning of the second semester.

 

EASC 610: Seminar I

This course is intended to provide students planning a research career in Earth Science with the opportunity to develop the skill of critically reading and evaluating research papers. The course is open to all students, and is a required component of the MSc programme. The course will consist of a weekly timetabled session in which students will read, present and discuss influential research papers across a broad range of subject areas.

 

EASC 661: Geoscience Professional Practice

The objective of this course is to improve the writing and communication skills of students and prepare them for a career in the geoscience profession. Course content: Preparation of geological reports, project proposals and oral presentations. Mining/minerals and petroleum laws and regulation. Corporate structure and management. Exploration management and quality assurance of geological data. Professional ethics. Professional organizations and societies. Professional development and training. Best practice guidelines in the geosciences. In addition, students will learn how to search and apply for job, and how to perform well at interviews. There will be occasional lectures to be delivered by professionals from industry.

 

Reading list

 Andrews, G.C. (2008). Canadian professional engineering and geoscience: Practice and Ethics. Canada: Nelson College Indigenous

Buchanan, R., Adkins-Heljeson, M. & Bates, R. (2011). Geowriting. Virginia: American Geological Institute.

Hofmann, A.H. (2009). Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and Presentations. USA: Oxford University Press.

Morales, G. (2012). How to land a top-paying geoscience professors job. USA: Tebbo (April 8, 2012)

Rosen, S. & Paul, C. (1997). Career renewal: Tools for scientists and technical professionals. London: Academic Press.

Samuels, B.M. & Sanders, D. (2010). Practical law of architecture, engineering, and geoscience. Canada: Prentice-Hall

 

 

EASC 662: Geostatistics

This course deals with the application of geostatistics in the evaluation of natural resources. The different spatial analytical tools will be taught in detail with specific examples from the Ghanaian environment. Topics to be treated include basic statistics, assessment of data accuracy and validity, simple spatial prediction methods, variography, ordinary kriging, co-kriging, kriging with external drift, disjunctive kriging, indicator kriging, and conditional simulation. Much emphasis will be placed on the practical aspects of the course. As such, the final assessment of the course will be based on the successful completion of mini projects which will involve the analyses and interpretation of geospatial datasets from the local Ghanaian environment.

 

Reading list

Devore J., Farnum, N. (1999). Applied statistics for engineers and scientists. USA: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company

Goovaerts, P. (1997).  Geostatistics for natural resources evaluation (Applied Geostatistics series). USA: Oxford University Press

Johnson, R.A., Wichern, D.W., (1998). Applied multivariate statistical analysis. USA: Prentice Hall

Meyers, L. S., Gamst, G., & Guarino, A.J. (2005). Applied multivariate research: Design and interpretation. London: SAGE Publications.

Shumway, R.H. & Stoffer, D.S. (2010). Time series analysis and its applications. New York: Springer.

Warner, R. M. (2007). Applied statistics: From bivariate through multivariate techniques. USA: SAGE Publications

Webster, R., & Oliver, M.A., (2007). Geostatistics for environmental scientists. England: John Wiley & Sons.

 

EASC 663: GIS Applications in Earth Science

This course will provide both theory and practical hands-on approach to spatial database design and spatial data analysis with Geographical Information Systems (GIS) as applied to groundwater investigations, mineral exploration, and petroleum exploration. The platform used will be ArcGIS, MapInfo, and Microsoft Excel, but the techniques developed will be applicable to other software. Laboratory work and field exercises provide hands-on experience with collection, mapping and analysis of geologic and other field data using GPS equipment and GIS software.

 

Reading List

Carranza, E. J. M. (2008). Geochemical anomaly and mineral prospectivity mapping in gis, volume 11 (handbook of exploration and environmental geochemistry). Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Coburn, T.C. & Yarus, J.M. (Eds.) (2000). Geographic information systems in petroleum exploration and development. USA: american association of petroleum geologists.

Legg, C. (1995). remote sensing and geographic information systems: geological mapping, mineral exploration and mining (wiley-praxis series in remote sensing). John Wiley & Sons Inc

Lunetta, R. S. & Lyon, J. G. (2004). Remote sensing and GIS accuracy assessment (mapping science). Florida: CRC Press.

Strassberg, G., Jones, N.L. & Maidment, D.R. (2011). Arc hydro groundwater: GIS for hydrogeology. USA: ESRI Press

 

EASC 664: Remote Sensing for Earth Scientists

The course covers the application of remote sensing to groundwater investigations, mineral exploration, and petroleum exploration. The course covers aerial photography and satellite image interpretations using multispectral, thermal infrared, and radar images. The course includes three hour weekly practical sessions designed to take the student through photogrammetry, aerial photo interpretation, and geological interpretation of satellite images.

 

Reading List

Avery, T. E. & Berlin, G. L. (1992). Fundamentals of remote sensing and airphoto interpretation. NY: Macmillan Publishing Company

Clark, P. E. & Rilee, M. L. (2010). Remote sensing tools for exploration: Observing and interpreting the electromagnetic spectrum. New York: Springer.

Legg, C. (1995). Remote sensing and geographic information systems: Geological mapping, mineral exploration and mining (Wiley-Praxis Series in Remote Sensing). UK: John Wiley & Sons Inc

Lunetta, R. S. & Lyon, J. G. (2004). Remote sensing and GIS accuracy assessment (Mapping science). CRC press.

McCoy, R. M. (2004). Field methods in remote sensing. New York: The Guilford Press

 

EASC 620: Geological Concepts

This course is in two parts. The first part introduces basic concepts in geology, mineralogy, petrography and geological processes. The latter encompasses earth structure, geological time, stratigraphy, deformation of rocks, the geological cycle and plate tectonics. Other topics include weathering, erosion, soil formation and the development of landforms. The second part involves an introduction to map reading and navigation skills using topographic maps, aerial photographs, a compass and global positioning system, as well as identification of common rock types in the field, how to collect and interpret basic structural data and how to prepare a basic geological map.

 

Reading List

Coe, A.L.  (2009). Geological field techniques.  UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Jerram, D. & Petford, N. (2011). Field description of igneous rocks (Geological field guide). Wiley.

Lisle, R.J. & Leyshon P.R. (2004). Stereographic projection techniques for geologists and civil engineers. UK: Cambridge University Press

Lisle, R.J., Brabham, P., &  Barnes, J.W. (2011). Basic geological mapping (Geological field guide). Wiley.

Pough, F.H., Peterson, R.T. & Scovil, J. (1998). A field guide to rocks and minerals (Peterson field guides). Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

 

EASC 630: Geoscience Fieldwork

Fieldwork is an integral part of Earth Science training, and it is used to consolidate students' understanding by illustrating classroom-taught concepts in the field. The course focuses on geological mapping, geophysical surveying or environmental fieldwork depending on which degree programme the student is following. Students study and collect geological data in the field. Geophysics students may however use that time undertaking valuable training in a variety of measuring techniques. A total of seven days are spent in the field under faculty supervision.

 

Reading List

Assaad, F.A., LaMoreaux, J.W., & Hughes, T (Eds.) (2004). Field methods for geologists and hydrogeologists. Springer.

Assad, F.A. (2009). Field methods for petroleum geologists: A guide to computerized lithostratigraphic correlation charts case study: Northern Africa. Springer.

Coe, A.L. (Ed.). (2010). Geological field techniques. Wiley-Blackwell

Compton, R.R. (1985). Geology in the field. Wiley.

Freeman, T. (1999). Procedures in field geology. Wiley-Blackwell.

McCoy, R.M. (2004). Field methods in remote sensing. The Guilford Press.

Milsom, J.J. & Eriksen, A. (2011). Field geophysics (Geological field guide). Wiley.

 

 

MSc PETROLEUM GEOSCIENCE COURSES

 

PGSC 601: Petroleum Geology

This course explains background to selected geological principles and processes, and describe how certain petroleum reservoirs and source rocks are formed. It also covers the fundamentals of drilling, well completions and production operations. Course content include: minerals and rocks; plate tectonics; geological time; surface geological processes; diagenesis; reservoirs; structural geology and petroleum; origin, migration, and trapping of petroleum; reservoir fluid properties; exploration and drilling technology; well completion and workover; and production operations; offshore operations.

 

Reading List

Glennie, K. (1998). Petroleum geology of the north sea: Basic concepts and recent advances. Wiley-Blackwell

Hyne, N.J.  (2001). Nontechnical guide to petroleum geology, exploration, drilling and production. Pennwell Books

Kesse, G.O. (1985). The mineral and rock resources of Ghana. Taylor & Francis.

Link, P.K. (2007). Basic petroleum geology. Oil & Gas Consultants International

Selley, R.C. (1997). Elements of petroleum geology. Academic Press.

Stoneley, R. (1995). Introduction to petroleum exploration for non-geologists. USA: Oxford University Press.

 

PGSC 602: Economics and Legal Framework of Petroleum Industry

This course covers the basic economics in the petroleum life cycle and the fundamentals of international oil and gas law. Students study cash flow techniques for economic evaluations and investigate frequently encountered situations. Students also learn how to choose the best investments and how to properly evaluate investment opportunities. They will also be introduced to the philosophy, evolution, and fundamentals of international petroleum contracts. They will be given a basic understanding of the legal fundamentals that make international transactions work.

Reading List

Appiah-Adu, K. (2013) (Ed.). Governance of the petroleum sector in an emerging developing economy. Gower Pub Co

Conaway, C.F. (1999). The petroleum industry: A nontechnical guide. Pennwell Books.

Falola, T. & Genova, A (2005). The politics of the global oil industry: An introduction. Praeger.

Johnston, D & Johnston, D (2005). Introduction to oil company financial analysis. PennWell Corp.

Speight, J.G. (2011). An introduction to petroleum technology, economics, and politics. Wiley-Scrivener

Taverne, B (1994). An introduction to the regulation of the petroleum industry: Laws, contracts and conventions (international energy & resources law & policy). Springer

Van Vactor, S.A. (2010). Introduction to the global oil & gas business. PennWell Corp.

 

PGSC 603: Sedimentary Basins and Tectonics

This course is divided into three parts. Part I deals with basin tectonics. It first examines how basins are formed and how they are linked to the Earth’s thermal behaviour and plate tectonics. It then describes the mechanisms of crustal and lithospheric thinning. Then the structures associated with the termination of basin formation and the deformation of their contents are described and discussed. Part II deals with the methods used to carry out basin analysis and the applications of basin analysis in the interpretation of geologic history and the identification of fossil fuels. Part III deals with the geology and hydrocarbon potential of the sedimentary basins of Ghana.

 

Reading List

Allen, P.A. & Allen, J.R. (2013). Basin analysis: Principles and application to petroleum play assessment. Blackwell Publishing

Busby, C & Pérez, A.A. (2012). Tectonics of sedimentary basins: Recent advances. Wiley-Blackwell.

Kleinspehn, K.L. & Paola, C. (1988). New perspectives in basin analysis (Frontiers in sedimentary geology). Springer

Leeder, M.R. (2011). Sedimentology and sedimentary basins: From turbulence to tectonics. Wiley-Blackwell.

Miall, A.D. (2010). Principles of sedimentary basin analysis. Springer.

 

PGSC 604: Health Safety and Environment

The course covers the basics of Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) and HES management related to the petroleum industry. Course content includes: Environmental risk management and assessment; emission limits and control; Environmental monitoring and data management; Spill response; Site assessment, management and remediation; Health risk and impact assessment; Food and water hygiene; Medical surveillance/ Industrial hygiene; Safety techniques for hazard and effect management; Process safety and hazards control; Hazard communication; Fire, tool and electrical safety; Noise and vibration; Radiation and radioactive sources; Construction and demolition; Excavation; Risk assessment and management; Planning and procedures; Emergency response; Performance management; Incident reporting & investigation; Audit; Management review.

 

Reading List

Asbury, S. (2007). Health & safety, environment and quality audits. Routledge

Cahill, L.B. & Kane, R.W. (2011). Environmental health and safety audits. Government Institutes.

Center for the Advancement of Process Tech (2009). Safety, health, and environment. Prentice Hall.

Speegle, M. (2012). Safety, health, and environmental concepts for the process industry. Cengage Learning.

Taylor, B. (2005). Effective environmental, health, and safety management using the team approach. Wiley-Interscience.

Thomas, C.E. (2011). Process technology: Safety, health, and environment. Cengage Learning.

 

PGSC 605: Fundamentals of Petrophysics

This course discusses the principles, applications, and integration of petrophysical information for reservoir description. The course begins by considering the nature of the borehole environment, and the way in which the drilling process may alter the properties of rocks and their contained fluids. Next, the general principles of physics are developed to explain the functioning of modern logging tools. Then it covers the basic operations of mudlogging, including the analysis of drill cuttings. Finally it discusses the physical principles behind, and the operation of the major well logging tools.

 

Reading List

Asquith, G.B. (2012). Fundamentals of petrophysical well-log interpretation: A course-note collection with commentary. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Buryakovsky, L. Chilingar, G.V., Rieke, H.H. & Shin, S. (2012). Fundamentals of the petrophysics of oil and gas reservoirs. New Jersey: Wiley-Scrivener.

Donaldson, E.C. & Tiab, D. (2003). Petrophysics: Theory and Practice of Measuring Reservoir Rock and Fluid Transport Properties. USA: Gulf Professional Publishing

Schön, J.H. (2004). Physical properties of rocks, volume 8: Fundamentals and principles of petrophysics (Handbook of petroleum exploration and production). Pergamon.

Zinszner, B & Pellerin, F. (2007). A geoscientist's guide to petrophysics. Editions Technip.  

 

PGSC 606: Reservoir Characterization and Modeling

This course integrates standard petroleum reservoir data (rock facies, seismic, petrophysics and structural geology) with up-to-date industry modeling software. It introduces the basic concepts of soft computing techniques applied to reservoir characterization. Some advanced statistical and hybrid models are also presented. The specific applications include different reservoir characterization topics such as prediction of petrophysical properties from well logs and seismic attributes. Students integrate well log, core, thin section, seismic reflection, and other datasets to characterize and develop geologically realistic, predictive computer model of reservoirs. Integrated software systems that incorporate mapping and petroleum systems and play analysis tools will be taught.

 

 

 

 

Reading List

Chambers, R., Hird, K., Tillman, R. & Yarus, J. (2001). applied reservoir characterization using geostatistics: The value of spatial modeling (Proceedings volume, AAPG Hedberg research conference). American assoc. of petroleum geologists.

Deutsch, C.V. (2002). Geostatistical reservoir modeling. USA: Oxford University Press

Harris, P.M. (Ed.) (2006). Giant hydrocarbon reservoirs of the world: From rocks to reservoir characterization and modeling. Society for sedimentary geology.

Nikravesh,M.,  Zadeh, L.A. & Korotkikh, V. (2010). Fuzzy partial differential equations and relational equations: Reservoir Characterization and Modeling (Studies in fuzziness and soft computing). Springer.

Rahman, J., Mondol, N.H. & Jahren, J. (2012). Reservoir characterization: Using geophysical techniques (Compaction, rock physics analysis, AVO modeling and seismic inversion). LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing

Stoudt, E.L. & Harris, P.M. (1995). Hydrocarbon reservoir characterization: Geologic framework and flow unit modeling (SEPM short course notes ; No. 34). SEPM Society for sedimentary geology.

Wong, P., Aminzadeh, F. & Nikravesh, M. (2011). Soft computing for reservoir characterization and modeling (Studies in fuzziness and soft computing). Physica.

 

PGSC 607: Seismic Reflection Acquisition and Processing

This course is designed to give students an understanding in the standard methods used in acquiring and processing seismic reflection data. The course begins with a brief review of elastic waves and phenomena such as reflection, refraction, diffraction and attenuation which occur as these waves propagate through the earth. The acquisition component outlines the equipment used; survey design; typical acquisition procedures for land and marine surveys; and auxiliary information such as uphole and shallow refraction surveys. The processing component deals in a non-mathematical way with the processes used to convert field data to final section. In particular, velocity analysis, statics, CDP stack, deconvolution and migration will be discussed.

 

Reading List

Cape, C.D. (1989). Seismic reflection data acquisition, processing and interpretation: A set of teaching exercises. Geophysics Division, Dept. of Scientific and Industrial Research.

Klemperer, S.L. & Hobbs, R. (Eds.) (1992). The BIRPS Atlas: Deep seismic reflections profiles around the British Isles. Cambridge University Press

Lavergne, M & Marshall, N. (2009). Seismic methods. Springer

Priest, T. (2009). The offshore imperative: Shell Oil's search for petroleum in Postwar America. Texas A&M University Press

Wencai, Y. (2013). Reflection seismology: Theory, data processing and interpretation. Elsevier.

Yilmaz, O. (2001). Seismic data analysis: Processing, inversion and interpretation of seismic data. Society of Exploration Geophysicists

 

PGSC 608: Well Log Interpretation

In this course students are given good grounding in the interpretation of well log data. It covers the major well logging tools, i.e., caliper logs, self-potential, resistivity, gamma ray, sonic, density and neutron logs, and dipmeter logs.  The course will teach valuable skills on how well log data can be used in the determination of lithology, fluid type, saturation, and porosity, and in paleoenvironment analysis. Hands-on exercises provide practice in the interpretation of various logs. Such interpretation ranges from identifying the lithologies and the presence of water and hydrocarbons to paleoenvironmental interpretations of logged rock sequences.

 

Reading List

Baker Hughes (2002). Introduction to wireline log analysis (Baker atlas). Baker Hughes, Inc.

Boyer, S. & Coppens, F.  (1999). Wireline logging. Editions Technip.

Darling, T. (2005). Well logging and formation evaluation (Gulf drilling guides). Gulf Professional Publishing

Ellis, D.V. & Singer, J.M.  (2010). Well logging for earth scientists. Springer.

Evenick, J.C. (2008). Introduction to well logs and subsurface maps. PennWell Corp.

Krygowski, D., Asquith, G.B., & Gibson, C.R. (Eds) (2004). Basic well log analysis for geologists. American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

 

PGSC 609: Seismic and Sequence Stratigraphy

This course involves the application of the techniques of exploration seismology to stratigraphic study. The course is divided into two parts. The first part focuses on the fundamental principles of sequence stratigraphy, and methods and applications of sequence stratigraphy which include investigation of sedimentary cycles at various scales and identification of key surfaces, depositional sequences, and depositional system tracts at various scales. The second part of the course introduces students to seismic stratigraphy, which involves identifying and interpreting unconformities and other reflector terminations such as offlaps and onlaps. A variety of practical exercises are used, and these form the basis of assessment.

 

Reading List

Emery, D. & Myers, K. (Eds.) (1996). Sequence stratigraphy. Wiley-Blackwell

Catuneanu, O. (2006). Principles of sequence stratigraphy (Developments in sedimentology).  Elsevier Science.

Veeken, P.P. (2007). Seismic stratigraphy, basin analysis and reservoir characterisation. (Handbook of geophysical exploration). Elsevier Science.

Trabant, P.K.  (1997). Seismic sequence stratigraphy. Springer-Verlag Berlin and Heidelberg GmbH & Co.

Williams, G.D. (Eds.) (1993). Tectonics & seismic sequence stratigraphy. American Association of Petroleum Geologists

Miall, A.D. (2010).  The geology of stratigraphic sequences. Springer.

 

PGSC 612: Seismic Reflection Interpretation

This course aims to give students an understanding into the interpretation of seismic reflection data. Topics covered in the lectures include time and depth sections, artificial structure caused by velocity variations, unconformities, folds, faults, piercement structures, bright spots, dim spots, polarity reversals and flat spots, time-structural maps, and seismic modelling. Practical work involves interpretation of 2D and 3D seismic data on paper. The practical sessions stress the effort and discipline involved in producing a self-consistent interpretation of horizons and faults.

 

 

 

Reading List

Bacon, M., Simm, R. & Redshaw, T. (2007). 3-D seismic interpretation. Cambridge University Press  

Brown, A.R. (2011).  Interpretation of three-dimensional seismic data, 7th edition. USA: American Association of Petroleum Geologists

Kleyn, A.H. (1982). Seismic reflection interpretation. Springer

McQuillin, R., Bacon, M. & Barclay, W. (1988). An introduction to seismic interpretation: reflection seismics in petroleum exploration. CRC Press

Wencai, Y. (2013). Reflection seismology: Theory, data processing and interpretation. Elsevier.

Yilmaz, O. (2001). Seismic data analysis: Processing, inversion and interpretation of seismic data. USA: Society of Exploration Geophysicists

 

PGSC 616: Reservoir Petrology

In this course students will learn how to unravel the complex geologic history of clastic and carbonate reservoirs from deposition through diagenesis to emplacement of hydrocarbons. The course covers clastic and carbonate mineralogy, depositional textures, microfacies, diagenesis, permeability, and porosity. The course teaches the invaluable skill of examining and describing drill core for sedimentology, reservoir quality, depositional environments and sequence stratigraphy. Sampling methods, types of sampling equipment and sedimentary rock analytical techniques, both available at the drilling rig-site and in the laboratory, are presented and discussed. Practical session will involve both macroscopic and microscopic examination of sandstones and carbonates.

 

Reading List

Boggs, S. Jr. (2009). Petrology of sedimentary rocks. Cambridge University Press.

Dandekar, A.Y. (2013). Petroleum reservoir rock and fluid properties. CRC Press.

Folk, R.L. (1981). Petrology of sedimentary rocks. Hemphill Pub Co.

Monicard, R. & Berley, D. (1980). Properties of reservoir rocks: Core analysis. Editions Technip.

Stow, D.A.V. (2005). Sedimentary rocks in the field: A color guide. Academic Press.

Tucker, M.E. (2001). Sedimentary petrology: An introduction to the origin of sedimentary rocks. Wiley-Blackwell

 

PGSC 618: Petroleum Geochemistry

The course begins with the development and concepts of petroleum geochemistry in petroleum exploration. It then discusses accumulation and sedimentation of organic matter, composition and structure of organic matter and crude oil deposits, transformation of kerogen to petroleum, methods of source rock analysis, thermal maturity and organic facies evaluation, biomarker groups and their applications, and hydrocarbon migration. Oil and gas characterisation and source correlation. Oil from coals. It then considers modelling hydrocarbon generation and geochemical characterization of reservoir fluids, sampling and analytical protocols. Finally the applications of reservoir geochemistry to field appraisal and field development will be discussed.

 

Reading List

Huc, A-Y (2013). Geochemistry of fossil fuels: From conventional to unconventional hydrocarbon systems. Editions Technip.

Bordenave, M. (1993). Applied petroleum geochemistry. Editions Technip.

Satyanarayana, D. (2013). Petroleum geochemistry. Daya Publishing House

Palacas, J.G. (1985) Petroleum geochemistry and source rock potential of carbonate rocks (AAPG studies in geology). American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

Liang, D., Wang, D., & Li, Z. (Eds.) (2007). Petroleum geochemistry and exploration in the Afro-Asian region: Proceedings of the 6th AAAPG international conference, Beijing, China. Taylor & Francis.

Norwegian Petroleum Society (1986). Petroleum geochemistry in exploration of the Norwegian shelf. Springer.

 

MSc APPLIED GEOPHYSICS COURSES

 

AGPY 601: Near-Surface Geophysics

This course provides an overview of the theory, principles, and practice of methods and techniques of shallow subsurface geophysical exploration. It will discuss relative utility of various methods, including refraction seismology, electrical, and electromagnetic and detail their application to exploration activities at shallow depths. Applications to shallow as well as deep survey will be elucidated, compared, and contrasted. Students will be taught the techniques of instrumentation, acquisition, processing and interpretation of near-surface geophysical data. The topics are illustrated by case studies, giving the students the tools to plan, conduct and analyze a near-surface geophysical survey.

 

Reading List

Burger, H.R. (1992). Exploration geophysics of the shallow subsurface. Prentice Hall PTR

Everett, M.E. (2013). Near-surface applied geophysics. Cambridge University Press

Kaufman, A.A. & Anderson, B. (2010). Principles of electric methods in surface and borehole geophysics, volume 44 (Methods in geochemistry and geophysics). Elsevier Science.

Keller, G.V. & Zhdanov, M.S. (1994). The geoelectrical methods in geophysical exploration (Methods in geochemistry and geophysics). American Geophysical Union.

Nabighian, M.N. (1988). Electromagnetic methods vol.1: Theory (Investigations in geophysics series no. 3). Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

 

AGPY 602: Gravity and Magnetic Methods

This course is designed for students to understand the techniques used to acquire, process and interpret gravity and magnetic data with a focus on mineral and oil industry applications. Topics to be covered include: instrumentation, field acquisition, processing, and interpretation of gravity and magnetic data (land and marine) and anomaly enhancement to define and map geological structures and their depth. Hands-on exercises provide practice in the use of gravity and magnetic data define ore deposits and to recognize the presence and estimate size of any sedimentary basins, and identify some features within them, such as salt domes.

 

Reading List

Foster, N.H. & Beaufmont, E.A. (1990). Geophysics IV: Gravity, magnetic and magnetotelluric methods/Tr-15 (746). American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

Hinze, W.J. (Ed.) (1985). The Utility of regional gravity and magnetic anomaly maps. Society of Exploration Geophysics

Hinze, W.J., von Frese, R.R.B. & Saad, A.H. (2013). Gravity and magnetic exploration: Principles, practices, and applications. Cambridge University Press

Mishra, D.C. (2011). Gravity and magnetic methods for geological studies: Principles, integrated exploration and plate tectonics. CRC Press

Nettleton, L.L. (1976). Gravity and magnetics in oil prospecting (McGraw-Hill international series in the earth and planetary sciences). USA: McGraw-Hill Inc.

Rama-Rao, B.S. & Murthy, I.V.R. (1978). Gravity and magnetic methods of prospecting. Arnold Heinemann

 

AGPY 603: Borehole Geophysics

This course discusses the basic principles of the many tools and techniques used in borehole logging projects. Applications are presented in terms of broad project objectives, providing a hands-on guide to geophysical logging programmes, including specific examples of how to obtain and interpret data that meet a specific hydrogeologic or environmental objective. Topics to be covered include: Planning a logging programme; log analysis – qualitative versus quantitative; log quality control; electric logs; nuclear logs; acoustic logs; borehole imaging logs; caliper logs; fluid logs; well construction logs; case histories.

 

Reading List

Kaufman, A.A. & Anderson, B (2010). Principles of electric methods in surface and borehole geophysics, volume 44 (Methods in geochemistry and geophysics). Elsevier Science.

Keys, W.S. (1990). Borehole geophysics applied to groundwater investigations. U.S. Geological Survey.

Keys, W.S. (1996). A practical guide to borehole geophysics in environmental investigations. CRC Press

Labo, J. (1987). A practical introduction to borehole geophysics: An overview of wireline well logging principles for geophysicists (Geophysical references, vol 2). Society of exploration geophysics.

Paillet, F.L. (1986). Application of borehole geophysics in the characterization of flow in fractured rocks. Geological Survey of Canada

Tang, X.M. & Cheng, A (2004). Quantitative borehole acoustic methods, volume 24 (Handbook of geophysical exploration: seismic exploration). Pergamon

 

AGPY 604: Applied Geophysics in Site Investigations

This course deals with geophysical imaging methods that provide solutions to a wide variety of environmental and engineering problems: protection of soil and groundwater from contamination; disposal of chemical and nuclear waste; geotechnical site testing; landslide and ground subsidence hazard detection; location of archaeological artifacts; detection and mapping of sinkholes and shallow buried objects, etc. The course comprehensively discusses the theory, data acquisition and interpretation of all of the principal geophysical methods used in engineering and environmental investigations. Each topic is supported by a large number of richly illustrated case histories.

 

Reading List

Idziak, A.F. & Dubiel, R. (Eds.) (2011). Geophysics in mining and environmental protection (GeoPlanet: Earth and Planetary Sciences). Springer

Jean-Luc Mari, J-L, & Chapelier, D. (1999). Reservoir and civil engineering geophysics. Editions Technip.

McCann, D.M., Eddleston, M., Fenning, P.J. & Reeves, G.M. (Eds.) (1998). Modern geophysics in engineering geology (Geological society engineering geology special publication, 12). The Geological Society.

McDowell, P.W. (2002). Geophysics in engineering investigations. Construction Industry Research.

Reynolds, J.M. (2011). An introduction to applied and environmental geophysics. Wiley.

Sharma, P.V. (1997). Environmental and engineering geophysics. Cambridge University Press

Vogelsang, D., Forstner, U. & Murphy, R. J. (Eds.) (1994). Environmental geophysics: A practical guide (Environmental engineering). Springer-Verlag.

 

AGPY 605: Airborne Geophysics

In this course students will understand the essentials of airborne geophysics so that they can evaluate the usefulness and application potential of the methods and results in their projects. Airborne geophysical methods to be taught include: aeromagnetic method; airborne electromagnetic method; airborne gamma-ray spectrometry; airborne gravity method; and remote sensing methods. All aspects of these methods will be discussed, including theoretical considerations, data acquisition, and data processing and interpretation, with the objective of locating concentrations of natural resources and defining their extent. Practical sessions will involve the interpretation of raw airborne geophysical data.

 

Reading List

Committee on Geodesy, Environment and Resources Commission on Geosciences, Division on earth and life studies, National Research Council (1995). Airborne geophysics and precise positioning: Scientific issues and future directions. National Academies Press.

Milsom, J.J. & Eriksen, A (2011). Field geophysics (Geological Field Guide). Wiley.

Mwano, J.M. (2011). Applied geophysics: Integrated interpretation of airborne geophysical data and satellite image for geological mapping. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.

Telford, W.M., Geldart, L.P. & Sheriff, R.E. (1990). Applied geophysics. Cambridge University Press.

Wendisch, M & Brenguier, J.L. (Eds.) (2013). Airborne measurements for environmental research: Methods and instruments (Wiley series in atmospheric physics and remote sensing) Wiley-VCH

 

AGPY 606: Earthquake Seismology

The course presents and discusses recent findings on the physics of earthquakes. Topics to be covered include seismicity studies from pre-historic periods to the most modern studies on a global scale, deep earthquakes, nucleation, stress transfer, triggering, hydrological processes, and recently discovered slow slips at plate boundaries. Practical understanding of the most commonly used processing techniques in earthquake seismology will also be treated. Each topic will be introduced with the basic theory followed by practical examples and exercises from both manually printed materials and computer exercises based on public domain software. There will be field visits to earthquake observatories, seismograph stations and seismometer sites.

 

 

Reading List

Bolt, B. (2003). Earthquakes, fifth edition. W. H. Freeman

Guidoboni, E. &  Ebel, J.E. (2009). Earthquakes and tsunamis in the past: A guide to techniques in historical seismology. Cambridge University Press

Havskov, J. & Ottemoller, L. (2010). Routine data processing in earthquake seismology: With sample data, exercises and software. Springer

Kanamori, H. (Ed.) (2009). Earthquake seismology: Treatise on geophysics. Elsevier.

Lee, W.H.K.,  Kanamori, H., Jennings, P. & Kisslinger, C (Eds.) (2003). International handbook of earthquake & engineering seismology, Part B, volume 81B (International geophysics) Academic Press.

Stein, S. & Wysession, M. (2002). An introduction to seismology, earthquakes and earth structure. Wiley-Blackwell.

 

 

MSc APPLIED GEOCHEMISTRY COURSES

 

AGCH 601: Trace Element Geochemistry

The course consists of a series of lectures on the application of trace element geochemistry to the understanding of trace element partitioning during partial melting and fractional crystallization. The emphasis of the course is on the use of trace element geochemistry to understand the origin and evolution of igneous rocks. The approach is to discuss the parameters that control partitioning of trace elements between phases and to develop models for the partitioning of trace elements between phases in igneous systems, especially between minerals and melt. Throughout the course, lectures are interspersed with papers that are to be read by students and discussed during class.

 

Reading List

Denbigh, K. (1981). The principles of chemical equilibrium. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Gordon, P. (1983). Principles of phase diagrams in materials systems. Malabar, Fla: Krieger Pub Co.

McSween, H.Y. Jr., Richardson, S.M. & Uhle, M.E. (2003). Geochemistry: Pathways and processes. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Rollinson, H.R. (1993). Using geochemical data: evaluation, presentation, interpretation. Harlow, Essex, England: Longman Group.

Shaw, D.M. (2006). Trace elements in magmas. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press

Wood, B.J. & Fraser, D.G. (1977). Elementary thermodynamics for geologists. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Zou, H. (2007). Quantitative geochemistry. London, UK: Imperial College PressAmazon logo Albarede, F. Introduction to geochemical modeling. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 1995. ISBN: 9780521454513.

 

AGCH 602: Solid Earth Geochemistry

This course presents an advanced study into the geochemistry of planet earth. It discusses the composition and evolution of the planet earth and the geochemical methods used to make these determinations. Additional topics include phase transitions, the primitive mantle, differentiation of the mantle, mantle geochemical reservoirs, and evolution of the depleted upper mantle and mantle plume reservoirs, composition of the oceanic and continental crust, mid-oceanic ridge basalts, oceanic island, plateau and submarine mountain basalts; geochemical characteristics, intra-crust differentiation, partition of minor elements in crustal conditions.

 

Reading List

Brownlow, A.H. (1978). Geochemistry. Prentice Hall College Div

Faure, G. (1998). Principles and applications of geochemistry (2nd edition). Prentice Hall

Rollinson, H.R. (1993). Using geochemical data: Evaluation, presentation, interpretation. Harlow, Essex, England: Longman Group.

Shaw, D.M. (2006). Trace elements in magmas. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press

White, W.M. (2013). Geochemistry. Wiley-Blackwell

 

AGCH 603: Isotope Geochemistry

This course is divided into two parts. The first part deals with the principles of radioactivity and its geochemical applications to several geological processes and systems. Students will learn how to infer the chemical characteristic of long-lived geochemical reservoirs using radiogenic isotopes as tracers and also how to use the latter to analyse mixing of materials from different reservoirs. The second part covers stable isotopes of H, C, O and S, and its application to several geological processes and systems. On completion of this part, students will be familiar with the application of stable isotope methods in the study of the Earth's major geochemical cycles.

 

Reading List

Dickin, A.P. (2005). Radiogenic isotope geology. Cambridge University Press

Faure, G & Mensing, T.M. (2004). Isotopes: Principles and applications. Wiley

Hoefs, J. (2010). Stable isotope geochemistry. Springer.

Holland, H.D. & Turekian, K.K. (2010). Isotope geochemistry: A derivative of the treatise on geochemistry. Academic Press.

Sharp, Z. (2006). Principles of stable isotope geochemistry. Prentice Hall.

White, W.M. (2013). Geochemistry. Wiley-Blackwell.

 

AGCH 604: Advanced Environmental Geochemistry

This course is about natural processes of Earth's surface and the impacts of human activities on environments. It will cover natural and anthropogenically perturbed aspects of the Earth's hydrosphere and its interaction with surface rocks, sediments, soils, the biosphere and the atmosphere. Special attention will be given to the geochemical processes that relates to the mining environment. Oxidation of sulfide minerals, water chemistry in a mining environment, acid neutralization capacity of rocks, acid mining drainage (AMD) and its prevention will be discussed in details with case studies.

 

 

Reading List

De Vivo, B., Belkin, H. & Lima, A. (2008). Environmental geochemistry: Site characterization, data analysis and case histories. Elsevier Science

Eby, N. (2003). Principles of environmental geochemistry. Cengage Learning.

Langmuir, D. (1997). Aqueous environmental geochemistry. Prentice Hall.

Lollar, S. (2005). Environmental geochemistry: Treatise on geochemistry, second edition, volume 9. Elsevier Science

Sparks, D.L. (2002). Environmental soil chemistry, second edition. Academic Press.

 

AGCH 605: Medical Geochemistry

This course deals with the study of the relationships between the geochemistry of the environment in which we live and public health, with special emphasis on the tropical environment. The course will explore the field of medical geochemistry as it relates to environmental toxicology, epidemiology, pathology, geochemistry, and biological risk assessment. Discussion will include current data on the extent, distribution, and consequences of exposure to water- and soil-related toxins and other harmful agents. Each student will be expected to write a report on a selected element after doing a literature survey, and also give presentation.

 

Reading List

Bowman, C.A., Bobrowsky, P.T. & Selinus, O. (2003). Medical Geology: New relevance in the earth sciences. Episodes, 26, 270-278.

 Buffetaut, E. & Koeberl, C. (Eds.) (2001). Geological and biological effects of impact events. Berlin: Springer.

Chamley, H. (2003). Geosciences, environment and man. Boston: Elsevier Science Publishing Co.

Keller, E.A. (2001). Introduction to environmental geology. 2nd ed. NJ: Prentice Hall.

Komatina, M. (2004). Medical geology - effects of geological environments on human health. Boston: Elsevier Science Publishing Co.

Martin, R.E. (2000). Environmental micropaleontology: The application of microfossils to environmental geology. New York: Springer-Verlag.

Selinus, O., Alloway, B. J.  Centeno, J. A. Finkelman, R. B.  Fuge, R.  Lindh, U. & Smedley, P. (Eds.) (2000). Essentials of medical geology - Impacts of the natural environment on public health. Boston: Elsevier Academic Press.

 

 

MSc MINERAL EXPLORATION COURSES

 

MEXP 601: Mineral Resource Economics, Policies and Management

The course deals with subjects such as current mineral markets, legal and fiscal considerations, environmental regulations, problems of mining and processing, exploration design, and financial management. Aspects of mineral projects evaluation techniques covering time value of money concept, the concept of cash flow and cash flow criteria, mineral projects evaluation criteria, non-discounted and discounted cash flow methods, mining taxation considerations, inflation effects on project evaluation, and sensitivity and risk analysis techniques are also included in this course.

 

Reading List

Anderson, E.W. & Anderson, L.D. (1997). Strategic minerals: Resource geopolitics and global geo-economics. Wiley.

Journel, A.G. & Kyriakidis, P.C. (2004). Evaluation of mineral reserves: A simulation approach (Applied geostatistics series). USA: Oxford University Press

Kesler, S.E. (1994). Mineral resources, economics, and the environment.  Macmillan Coll Div.

Runge, I. (1998). Mining economics and strategy. Society for Mining Metallurgy and Exploration.

Tiess, G. (2011). Introduction to mineral resources policy. Springer.

Wellmer, F.W., Dalheimer, M., & Wagner, M. (2010). Economic evaluations in exploration.  Springer.

 

MEXP 602: Environmental and Social Issues in Mining

Social and environmental issues have become critical variables with respect to the economics of exploration and mining projects. There is strong understanding that geologists should have due considerations for these issues right from reconnaissance exploration to the start of mining and beyond. However, traditionally, geologists have little training in these traditional liberal courses. This course seeks to address this knowledge gab. It looks at contentious environmental and social issues with respect exploration and mining projects’ development, environmental and social impact assessment for minerals projects, social accountability schemes, global and national initiatives to address environmental and social issues in mining, livelihood challenges, issues of mining development and communities relocations, etc.

 

Reading List

Ali, S.H. (2009). Mining, the environment, and indigenous development conflicts. University of Arizona Press.

Bell, F.G. & Donnelly, L.J. (2006). Mining and its impact on the environment. Spon Press.

Richards, J. (2009). Mining, society, and a sustainable world. Springer.

Ripley, E.A., Redmann, R.E. & Crowder, A.A. (1995). Environmental effects of mining. St. Lucie Press.

Spitz, K. & Trudinger, J. (2008). Mining and the environment: From ore to metal. CRC Press.

VanZyl, C. & Koval, M (Eds) (1992). Risk assessment/management issues in the environmental planning of mines. Society for Mining Metallurgy & Exploration.

 

 

MEXP 603: Advanced Exploration Geochemistry

This course is devoted to modern geochemical techniques required for the detection of mineral anomalies, both in known mining areas and in "virgin" areas. The course will cover the principles and different types and methods of geochemical exploration. Also included are planning, sampling, laboratory analysis, data handling, and data interpretation. The course will involve lectures, practical exercises, and laboratory exercises. Throughout the course, lectures are interspersed with discussion of research articles that deals with recent advances in the field of exploration geochemistry, such as the mobile metal ion technology.

 

 

Reading List

Dunn, C.E. (2007). Biogeochemistry in Mineral Exploration, Volume 9 (Handbook of Exploration and Environmental Geochemistry). Elsevier Science

Evans, A., Whateley, M., & Moon, C. (2006). Introduction to Mineral Exploration. Blackwell Publishing Limited

Fletcher, W.K. (1981). Analytical Methods in Geochemical Prospecting (Handbook of Exploration Geochemistry) (Vol.1). Elsevier Science

Govett, G.J.S. (1982). Handbook of Exploration Geochemistry, Vol. 2: Statistics and Data Analysis in Geochemical Prospecting. Elsevier Science & Technology

Govett, G.J.S. (1983). Rock Geochemistry in Mineral Exploration. Elsevier Science

Levinson, A.A. & Bradshaw, M. (1987). Practical Problems in Exploration Geochemistry. Applied Pub Ltd

Naldrett, A.J. (2004). Magmatic Sulfide Deposits: Geology, Geochemistry and Exploration. Springer

 

MEXP 604: Exploration Geology

This course presents a practical step-by-step description of the key geological field mapping techniques needed by today's exploration geologists involved in the search for mineral deposits. It discusses the various types of mapping techniques fundamental to the collection, storage and presentation of geological data and useful for the location of ore deposits. Essentials of sampling and drilling techniques including pitting, trenching, rotary, percussion, reverse circulation, diamond core drilling, and core logging are also included. The course also covers exploration programme design, discusses the different types of surveys and provides an overview of quality assurance – quality control procedures for mineral exploration projects ranging from reconnaissance through to pre-feasibility.

 

Reading List

Evans, A., Whateley, M., & Moon, C. (2006). Introduction to Mineral Exploration. Blackwell Publishing Limited

Marjoribanks, R. (2010). Geological Methods in Mineral Exploration and Mining. Springer

Peters, W.C. (1978). Exploration Mining and Geology. John Wiley & Sons Inc

Reedman, J.H. (1979). Techniques in Mineral Exploration. Springer

Stevens, R. (2011). Mineral Exploration and Mining Essentials. Robert Stevens.

 

 

MSc ECONOMIC GEOLOGY COURSES

 

ECGL 601: Industrial Mineral Deposits

This course deals with the examination of the origin of the different industrial mineral deposits, as well as discussion of their treatment and uses. Topics to be covered include the geological occurrence, classification, mineralogical characterization, exploration and mining methods, and processing of industrial minerals. The course will also look at the economic importance, resource estimation and environmental assessments of industrial minerals. The course also includes field visits to industrial sites.

 

 

Reading List

Chatterjee, K.K. (2009). Uses of industrial minerals, rocks and freshwater. Nova Science Pub. Inc.

De Geoffroy, J.G. & Wignall, T.K. (1987). Statistical models for optimizing mineral exploration. Springer

Kogel, J.E., Trivedi, N.C., Barker, J.M. & Krukowski, S.T. (2006). Industrial minerals and rocks. Littleton, Colorado: Society for Mining Metallurgy, and Exploration.

Manning, D.A.C. (2005). Introduction to industrial minerals. Springer.

Wellmer, F.W. & Large, D. (1997). Statistical evaluations in exploration for mineral deposits. Springer.

 

ECGL 602: Sedimentary Ore Deposits

This course is intended to provide knowledge on the geology and evolution of sedimentary basins and their contained mineral deposits, paleo-environmental conditions that may have contributed to the formation and preservation of the ores, mineralization during subsequent burial and diagenesis, and ore systems developed during metamorphism and deformation of sedimentary basins. Students will gain an understanding of techniques widely used in exploration and research on ores in sediments, using real examples to illustrate the fundamental links between regional and deposit-scale geology and the origins of different deposit types.

 

Reading List

Force, E.R. (1991). Sedimentary and diagenetic mineral deposits: A basin analysis approach to exploration. Economic Geology Pub Co.

Guilbert, J.M., & Park, C.F. (2007). The geology of ore deposits. Waveland Pr Inc

Maynard, J.B. (2011). Geochemistry of sedimentary ore deposits. Springer.

Nicholson, K. (1996). Manganese mineralization: geochemistry and mineralogy of terrestrial and marine deposits (Geological Society Special Publication). Geological Society of London.

Robb, L.J. (2005). Introduction to ore-forming processes. Blackwell Science Ltd.

 

ECGL 603: Magmatic and Hydrothermal Ore Deposits

This course concerns the global distribution, geology and petrogenesis of magmatic and hydrothermal ore deposits. It will provide a broad overview of recent developments in the understanding of magmatic-hydorthermal processes. The course will review new ideas related to magmatic-hydorthermal processes, the techniques and approaches that have led to these ideas, and the implications for a variety of types of deposits, with special emphasis to the Birimian deposits. Individual papers review important concepts, and in several cases, present new results. After completion of the course students will thus have gained an improved capability to contribute to exploration for magmatic and hydrothermal ore deposits in Ghana and elsewhere.

 

Reading List

Barnes, H.L. (1997). Geochemistry of hydrothermal ore deposits. Wiley

Guilbert, J.M., & Park, C.F. (2007). The geology of ore deposits. Waveland Pr Inc.

Naldrett, A.J. (2004). Magmatic sulfide deposits: Geology, geochemistry and exploration. Springer.

Pirajno, F. (2001). Ore deposits and mantle plumes. Springer.

Robb, L.J. (2005). Introduction to ore-forming processes. Blackwell Science Ltd.

 

 

 

ECGL 604: Ore Mineralogy

This course is intended to encourage students to be both proficient and confident with the identification and interpretation of ore minerals. Students will learn about contemporary methods of ore investigation and how they can be applied to different types of ore deposits. Particular emphasis will be placed on deposits of the base and precious metals. Attention will be given to worked case examples. In Laboratory sessions students will use the reflected light microscope to identify and interpret ore mineral associations and textures. Thin section specimens will come from both deposits in Ghana and some selected base and precious metal ores from around the world.

 

Reading List

Craig, J.R. (1995). Ore microscopy and ore petrography. Wiley.

Klein, C. & Dutrow, B. (2007). Manual of mineral science (Manual of mineralogy). Wiley.

Pracejus, B. (2008). The ore minerals under the microscope, volume 3: An optical guide (Atlases in geoscience). Elsevier Science

Shrivastava, J.P. & Rani, N. (2013). Introduction to ore microscopy. PHI Learning Private Limited.

Taylor, R. (2009). Ore textures: Recognition and interpretation. Springer.

 

 

MSc ENGINEERING GEOLOGY

 

EGEO 601: Advanced Rock and Soil Mechanics

This course is designed for students to gain an advanced understanding of the geo-mechanical behaviour of rocks and soils and how they behave under different geotechnical design scenarios. Students will develop key skills in the assessment, description and testing of geological materials in order to understand and quantify their behaviour, using local and international standards. Students will also gain an advanced understanding of engineering and design in soils and rock masses, including fundamental design principles associated with common geotechnical solutions encountered on engineering geological and civil engineering projects.

 

Reading List

Banerjee, P.K. & Butterfield, R. (1990). Advanced geotechnical analyses: Developments in soil mechanics and foundation engineering - 4 (Vol 4). CRC Press.

Das, B.M. (2013). Advanced soil mechanics. CRC Press

Goodman, R.E. (1989). Introduction to rock mechanics. Wiley

Ng, C.W.W. & BMenzies, B. (2007). Advanced unsaturated soil mechanics and engineering. CRC Press

Liiban, A. & Affi, P.E. (2004). Soil mechanics and foundation design: 201 solved problems. SoilStructure.com

 

EGEO 602: Applied Engineering Geology

In this course students will be taught the key techniques for the identification and assessment of contaminated land and groundwater resources in an engineering geological context. Students will also be trained in the development of geological ground models and geomorphological terrain models within the content of engineering geological practice. They will, in addition, gain advanced experience in ground investigation using invasive techniques, in-situ tests and geophysical methods. Fieldwork component will involve training in techniques such as geomorphological mapping and walk-over surveys combined with interpretation of remote sensing and aerial photography.

 

Reading List

Bell, F.G. (2007). Engineering geology.  Butterworth-Heinemann.

Hencher, S. (2012). Practical engineering geology (Applied geotechnics). CRC Press.

Price, D.G. & Michael Freitas, M. (2008). Engineering geology: Principles and practice. Springer.

Simon, F.G., Meggyes, T. & McDonald, C. (2002). Advanced groundwater remediation: Active and passive technologies. Thomas Telford Publishing.

West, T.R. (2010). Geology applied to engineering. Waveland Pr Inc.

 

 

EGEO 603: Laboratory and Field Techniques in Engineering Geology

The course covers the conventional tests for soils used to index and classify soils, and to measure their permeability, consolidation characters, and shear strength. Content include: Basic instruction in rock core logging for geotechnical purposes; Techniques of site investigation including: sample description; soil drilling and sampling; in situ testing by cone, SPT, vane, field loading and pressuremeter testing; Principles of the laboratory measurement of load, stress, strain and pore water pressure; measurements with electronic sensors; selection of testing procedures and testing strategies; Field measurements of full-scale behaviour including: earth pressure cells; displacement gauges and piezometers; Analysis of potential errors and approaches for their mitigation.

 

Reading List

Dearman, W.R.  (1991). Engineering geological mapping (Butterworths advanced series in geotechnical engineering). Butterworth-Heinemann.

Griffiths, J.S. (2003). Mapping in Engineering Geology (Key Issues in Earth Sciences). Geological Society of London

Hencher, S. (2012). Practical engineering geology (Applied gotechnics). CRC Press.

Reddy, M.T. (2007). Applied engineering geology practicals. New Age International Pvt Ltd Publishers.

Warner, J. (2004). Practical handbook of grouting: Soil, rock, and structures. Wiley.

 

EGEO 604: Disaster Risk Assessment and Management

This course deals with contemporary concepts and practices in disaster risk management and the tools and methods that can be used in the reduction of disaster risk. It also involves determining the probability of a hazard occurring and estimating the consequences. It discusses methods for calculating the vulnerability of infrastructure assets to the common natural hazards. The course also reviews the important role GIS and remote sensing data play in disaster risk assessment and management. It emphasizes on the use of such spatial data during pre- and post-disaster management as well as in the design of risk reduction measures. Visits to organisations and other sites may be organised where appropriate.

 

Reading List

Arnold, M., Chen, R.S., Deichmann, U & Dilley, M. (2006). Natural disaster hotspots case studies (Disaster risk management). World Bank Publications.

Arnold, M., Dilley, M., Deichmann, U & Chen, R.S. (2005). Natural disaster hotspots: A global risk analysis (Disaster risk management). World Bank Publications.

Bennett, S. (2012). Innovative thinking in risk, crisis, and disaster management. Gower Pub Co.

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (2008). Disaster risk management systems analysis: A guide book (Environment and natural resources management series). FAO.

Smith, K (2013). Environmental hazards: Assessing risk and reducing disaster. Routledge.

Uddin, N. & Ang, A.H.S. (2011). Quantitative risk assessment for natural hazards (Council on disaster risk management (CDRM monograph no. 5)). American Society of Civil Engineers.

 

 

EGEO 605: Petroleum Geomechanics

In this course students will be taught the basics of geomechanics for wellbore applications; the origin of stresses in the subsurface and how in situ stresses can be understood from wellbore data. The course will also cover mechanical properties such as rock strength, and the origins of pore pressure and how it can be measured and estimated. The course will then proceed to elucidate how these data are applied to critical problems in petroleum exploration and field development. There are detailed case studies on wellbore stability sand production and hydraulic fracturing. The course also includes an introduction to reservoir geomechanics, showing the geomechanical influence of pressure changes in the reservoir.

 

Reading List

Desai, C.S. & Kundu, T. (2000). Computer methods and advances in geomechanics. Taylor & Francis

Fjar, E., Holt, R.M., Raaen, A.M. & Risnes, R. (2008). Petroleum related rock mechanics. Elsevier Science

Nauroy, J.F. (2011). Geomechanics applied to the petroleum industry. Editions Technip

Nikolaevskiy, V.N. (1995). Geomechanics and fluidodynamics: With applications to reservoir engineering. Springer

Zoback, M.D. (2010). Reservoir geomechanics. Cambridge University Press.

 

 

MSc HYDROGEOLOGY

 

HYGL 601: Advanced Hydrogeology (3 Credits)

This course provides a basic understanding of the physical characteristics of the water-bearing formations and groundwater flow. It covers the understanding of boundary and initial conditions that pertain during groundwater flow including flownet analysis. Groundwater-surface water interactions and the underlying principles for the interaction between freshwater and seawater shall be treated. This course also exposes the student to the behaviour of the various aquifer systems during groundwater flow. It presents the fundamental principles underlying the determination of the hydraulic characteristics of the various aquifer systems and the understanding of the mechanisms and equations of groundwater flow.

 

Reading List

Driscoll, F.G. (1989). Groundwater and wells. Minnesota: Johnson Filteration Systems Inc.

Fetter, C. W. (2000). Applied hydrogeology. Prentice Hall.

Fitts, C.R. (2002). Groundwater science. London: Academic Press

Freeze, R.A & Cherry, J.A. (1979).  Groundwater. N.J: Prentice Hall.

Schwartz, F.G, & Zhang, H. (2003). Fundamentals of groundwater. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

Strack, O.D.L. (1989).  Groundwater mechanics. N. J: Prentice Hall.

Todd, D.K. & Mays, L.W. (2008). Groundwater hydrology. New York: Wiley.

 

HYGL 602: Geochemistry of Natural Water Systems

The course will entail detailed analyses of the major controls on surface and subsurface water chemistry. It will begin with discussions on the major chemical constituents in natural water and the various sources of these chemical constituents. Rock-water interactions, ion exchange processes, sorption processes, and redox reactions in surface and subsurface systems will be treated in detail. Geochemical inverse modeling, chemical speciation, and geochemical analyses using mineral stability and ternary diagrams will be treated. The course will also assess the possibility of reconstructing the reactive mineralogies of basins using detailed geochemical models based on surface and groundwater geochemical data.

 

Reading List

Drever, J. (1988). Geochemistry of natural waters. Prentice Hall

Edmunds, W.M. & Shand, P. (2008). Natural groundwater Quality. Wiley-Blackwell

Merkel, B.J., Planer-Friedrich, B. & Nordstrom, D.K. (2008). Groundwater geochemistry: A practical guide to modeling of natural and contaminated aquatic systems. Springer.

Stumm, W. & Morgan, J.J. (1996). Aquatic chemistry: Chemical equilibria and rates in natural waters. Wiley-Interscience.

Stumm, W. (1992). Chemistry of the solid-water interface: Processes at the mineral-water and particle-water interface in natural systems. Wiley-Interscience.

 

HYGL 603: Applied Hydrology

This course will provide detailed training on the dynamics of the hydrological systems with emphasis on tropical environments. Topics to be discussed include hydrological processes, hydrological design and analysis. Students will be taken through the regiments of hydrological data collection, and the application of statistical models to hydrological data. Time series analysis, long term hydrological data for the prediction of floods, rainfall patterns and water resources assessment and management will be copiously treated. To this end, students will learn the basics of hydrological modelling, ARMA, ARIMA, AR, MA models, frequency analysis, Fourier transforms amongst others. 

 

Reading List

Chow, V., Maidment, D. and Mays, L. (1988). Applied hydrology. McGraw Hill.

Hornberger, G. M., Raffensperger, J. P., Wiberg, P. L. and Eshleman, K. N. (1998). Elements of physical hydrology. The Johns Hopkins University Press.

Manning, J. C. (1996). Applied principles of hydrology. 3rd Edition. Prentice Hall.

Schwartz, F. G, and Zhang, H. (2003). Fundamentals of groundwater. NY: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

Viessman, W. & Lewis, G. L. (2002). Introduction to hydrology. 5th edition. Prentice Hall.

Ward, A.D. & Trimble, S.W. (2003). Environmental hydrology. 2nd edition. CRC Press.

 

HYGL 604: Contaminant Hydrology

This course will treat all kinds of contaminants in surface and subsurface water systems. Organic, inorganic, radioactive, and biological contaminants, their characteristics, modes of transport in surface and subsurface waters, their reactivities, and toxities will be discussed in detail. Retardation and natural attenuation processes of contaminants in the vadose and saturated zones as well as surface flow systems will be discussed in detail. This course will also assess the various methods available for remediating contaminated surface and surface waters and contaminant source control measures. Contaminant transport using familiar numerical codes such as MT3DMS, RT3D, SEAM3D, SEEP2D, and WASH will treated as part of the course.  

 

Reading List

Apello, C.A.J. & Postma, D. (2005). Geochemistry, groundwater and pollution. 2nd edition, Amsterdam: A.A. Balkema.

Clark, I. & Fritz, P. (1997). Environmental isotopes in hydrogeology. Florida: Lewis Publishers.

Fetter, C.W. (1993).  Contaminant hydrogeology.  N.Y: Macmillan Publishing Company

Mazor, E. (2004). Chemical and Isotopic Groundwater hydrology. New York: Marcel Dekker,

Merkel, B.J., Planer-Friedrich, B. & Nordstrom, D.K. (2008). Groundwater geochemistry: A practical guide to modeling of natural and contaminated aquatic systems. Springer.

 

 

HYGL 605: Catchment Hydrology

This course deals with the hydrological processes around a catchment in a basin. It provides a comprehensive treatment of the fundamentals of catchment hydrology, principles of isotope geochemistry, and the isotope variability in the hydrologic cycle. Topics to be covered include: evapotranspiration and land-atmosphere interaction; observations and modeling of runoff generation; stream-groundwater interaction and hyporheic zone processes; transport of agrichemicals in catchments; and biogeochemical cycling and acid deposition.

 

Reading List

Brooks, K.N., Ffolliott, P.F. & Magner, J.A. (2012). Hydrology and the management of watersheds. Wiley-Blackwell

Grayson, R. & Blöschl, G. (2001). Spatial patterns in catchment hydrology: Observations and modelling. Cambridge University Press

Haan, C.T., Barfield, B.J. & Hayes, J.C. (1994). Design hydrology and sedimentology for small catchments. Academic Press

Kendall, C. & McDonnell, J.J. (1999). Isotope tracers in catchment hydrology (Developments in water science). Elsevier Science.

Walker, G. & Zhang, L. (2002). Studies in catchment hydrology (The basics of recharge & discharge). CSIRO.

 

HYGL 606: Applied Groundwater Modeling

The objective of this course is to equip students with the necessary background knowledge in the application of numerical groundwater flow codes to groundwater resources management and the estimation of the familiar aquifer parameters. It will comprise the application of mainly finite element and finite difference numerical groundwater flow simulation codes with a strong background in the mathematics of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in groundwater systems. The course will comprise a limited lecture session and detailed practical sessions. Laboratory exercises will entail the use of MODFLOW, FEMWATER, MODPATH, MT3DMS, and UTCHEM. The application of isotope data to constrain aquifer properties in groundwater studies will be discussed in detail.

 

Reading List

Anderson, M.P. & Woessner, W.W. (1991). Applied groundwater modeling: Simulation of flow and advective transport. Academic Press.

Bear, J. & Cheng, A.H.-D. (2009). Modeling groundwater flow and contaminant transport (Theory and applications of transport in porous media). Springer.

Istok, J.D. (1989). Groundwater modeling by the finite element method (Water resources monograph). American Geophysical Union.

Kresic, N. (2006). Hydrogeology and groundwater modeling, second edition.CRC Press.

Merkel, B.J., Planer-Friedrich, B. & Nordstrom, D.K. (2008). Groundwater geochemistry: A Practical guide to modeling of natural and contaminated aquatic systems. Springer.

 

HYGL 608: Petroleum Hydrogeology

This course uses the similarities in flows between petroleum resources and groundwater to study the transport of both resources in tandem. The course is designed to enable students apply the concepts of groundwater flow and storage to study the transport of petroleum resources. It is intended to be practical and will use current exploration activities in Ghana’s major sedimentary terrains as case studies. Conductive properties of porous media and the unique properties of petroleum and groundwater will be discussed using case studies. Students will learn how to apply groundwater flow models in deep reservoirs to study the migration and accumulation of petroleum resources.

 

Reading List

Dahlberg, E.C. (2011). Applied hydrodynamics in petroleum exploration. Springer.

Downing, R.A., Price, M. & Jones, G.P.  (2005). The hydrogeology of the chalk of North-West Europe. USA: Oxford University Press

Mazor, E. (2004). Global water dynamics: Shallow and deep groundwater, petroleum hydrology, hydrothermal fluids, and landscaping. CRC Press.

Noonan, D.C. & Curtis, J.T. (1990). Groundwater remediation and petroleum: A guide for underground storage tanks. CRC Press

Wright, E.P. & Burgess, W.G. (1992). The hydrogeology of crystalline basement aquifers in africa. American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

 

 

 

 

 

MSc GEOLOGY COURSES

 

GLGY 601: Advanced Igneous Petrology

This course covers the history of and recent developments in the study of igneous rocks. It will review advanced concepts in the origin and evolution of magmatic systems, effects of different tectono thermal regimes on magma genesis, magma dynamics, and phase equilibria in magmatic systems. It involves the integration of geochemical, geological, and petrographic data in the interpretation of the origin of igneous rocks. Concepts are illustrated by rock suites from Ghana and elsewhere. Students review the chemistry and structure of igneous rock-forming minerals and proceed to study how these minerals occur and interact in igneous rocks.

 

Reading List

Best, M.G. (2002). Igneous and metamorphic petrology. Wiley-Blackwell.

Cox, K.G, Bell, J.D & Pankhurst, R.J. (1979). The interpretation of igneous rocks. London: George Allen & Unwin.

Faure, G. (2000). Origin of igneous rocks. Springer.

McBirney, A.R. (2006).  Igneous petrology. Jones & Bartlett Publishers.

Rollinson, H.R. (1993). Using geochemical data: Evaluation, presentation, interpretation. Prentice Hall.

Wilson, B.M. (2010). Igneous petrogenesis: A global tectonic approach. Springer.

Yoder, H.S. Jr. (1979). The evolution of the igneous rocks. Princeton.

 

GLGY 602: Advanced Metamorphic Petrology

This course involves the study of advanced concepts in the evolution of metamorphic bodies and systems. Students will learn how to interpret metamorphic processes on the basis of mineral assemblages, mineral chemistry, chemical thermodynamics, transport theory, experimental petrology, and field studies. They will also learn about mineral reactions and textural changes in response to dynamothermal processes and the applications of geothermobarometry and petrochonology to rocks from a variety of tectonic environments. Isotope mobility and thermal models for orogenic belts will also be studied. The course involves lectures and laboratory work.

 

Reading List

Best, M.G. (2002). Igneous and metamorphic petrology. Wiley-Blackwell

Kretz, R. (1994). Metamorphic Crystallization. Wiley

Philpotts, A.R.  (2003). Petrography of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Waveland Pr Inc.

Rollinson, H.R. (1993). Using geochemical data: Evaluation, presentation, interpretation. Prentice Hall.

Vernon, R.H. & Clarke, G. (2008). Principles of metamorphic petrology. Cambridge University Press.

Winter, J.D. (2009). Principles of igneous and metamorphic petrology (2nd edition). Prentice Hall.

 

GLGY 603: Advanced Mineralogy

This course will provide a comprehensive review and practical understanding of advanced concepts in mineralogy, crystal chemistry and the methods that are applied in modern research. It will discuss the causes and consequences of compositional variation in common silicate minerals, the thermodynamic consequences of mineral stability and energetic consequences of solid solution, exsolution and phase diagrams. At the end of the course students should be able to (i) predict the protolith, composition and metamorphic grade on the basis of petrography, and (ii) be familiar with the most common structural features of minerals, kinetic processes in mineralogy, and the causes and consequences of transformation processes in mineralogy.

 

Reading List

Dyar, M., Gunter, M.E. & Tasa, D. (2007). Mineralogy and optical mineralogy. Mineralogical Society of America.

Klein, C. (2007). Minerals and rocks: Exercises in crystal and mineral chemistry, crystallography, x-ray powder diffraction, mineral and rock identification, and ore mineralogy. Wiley.

Marfunin, A.S. (1995) (Ed.). Methods and instrumentations: Results and recent developments (Advanced mineralogy). Springer.

Marfunin, A.S. (2011) (Ed.). Advanced mineralogy: Volume 1 composition, structure, and properties of mineral matter: Concepts, results, and problems. Springer.

Perkins, D. & Henke, K.R. (2003). Minerals in thin section (2nd edition). Prentice Hall.

Perkins, D. (2010). mineralogy (3rd edition). Prentice Hall.

 

GLGY 604: Advanced Geotectonics

This course comprises recent advances in the knowledge on structure and development of the Earth, especially of its crust and mantle. It discusses older and new geological ideas concerning development of the crust, with emphasis on the plate tectonics. It focuses on the examination of modern tectonic principles and fundamental tectonic elements of the earth’s lithosphere - orogenic belts, cratons, island arcs, rift zones, continental margins, etc., and discusses geotectonic models emphasizing modern plate tectonic concepts.

 

Reading List

Beloussov, V.V.  (1981). Geotectonics. Springer.

Condie, K.C. (1997). Plate tectonics. Butterworth-Heinemann

Frisch, W., Meschede, M. & Blakey, R.C. (2010). Plate tectonics: Continental drift and mountain building. Springer

Kearey, P., Klepeis, K.A., & Vine, F.J. (2009). Global tectonics. Wiley-Blackwell

Olsen, K.H. (1995). Continental rifts: Evolution, structure, tectonics (Developments in geotectonics). Elsevier Science.

Roberts, D.G. & Bally, A.W. (2012). Regional geology and tectonics: Phanerozoic passive margins, cratonic basins and global tectonic maps. Elsevier.

Tarling, D.H. (1981). Economic geology and geotectonics. Halsted Pr.

 

GLGY 605: Regional Geology

This course concerns the advanced treatment of the geology of West Africa. It will look at selected geological provinces in West Africa considers their evolution (i.e., genesis, petrology, tectonics, geochemistry, etc). Emphasis will also be placed on the economic mineral potential of these provinces. In order to increase efficiency of learning, the number of passive lectures will be minimised by means of practical sessions and seminar. Practicals will be terrane analysis through interpretation of maps, photographs and other data. Each student is further required to give a presentation on a reviewed paper to be followed by a discussion.

 

Reading List

Dallmeyer, R.D.  & Lecorche, J.P. (2012). The West African orogens and circum-atlantic correlatives (IGCP-Project 233). Springer.

Edge, D.M (1984). The Geology of West Africa: Volume 1 the west african transform fault basins. Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina.

Ennih, N. & Liegeois, J.P. (2008). The boundaries of the West African Craton - Special publication no. 297 (Geological Society special publication). Geological Society of London.

Evans, D.A.D., Reddy, S.M., Mazumder, R. & Collins, A.S (2009). Palaeoproterozoic supercontinents and global evolution (Geological Society London, special publication). Geological Society of London

McDonald, I., Boyce, A.J., Butler, I.B. & Herrington, R.J (2005). Mineral deposits & earth evolution (Geological Society special publication) (No. 248). Geological Society of London.

Wright, J.B. (1985). Geology and mineral resources of West Africa. Springer.

 

GLGY 606: Carbonate Sedimentology

This is an advanced course that examines carbonate sedimentology and depositional environments. Students to identify depositional facies in a carbonate ramp or platform and analyze the spatial distribution of the carbonate facies belts and their relation to basin configuration and tectonic development. It will consider the economic importance of carbonates: major reservoirs for petroleum, base metals and potable water. Lectures will discuss the origin of carbonate rocks. It will also discuss the various types of carbonate depositional environments, their dimensions, geometry and distribution of facies belts, and how these parameters can be used to reconstruct the paleogeography of carbonate basins.

 

Reading List

Moore, C.H. (2001). Carbonate reservoirs. Amsterdam: Elsevier

Tucker, M.E. & Wright, V.P. (1991). Carbonate sedimentology. Wiley-Blackwell

Scholle, P.A., Bebout, D.G. & Moore, C.H. (1983). Carbonate depositional environments (AAPG Memoir). American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

Schlager, W. (2005). Carbonate sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy. Society for Sedimentary Geology (SEPM)

Morse, J.W. & Mackenzie, F.T. (1990). Geochemistry of sedimentary carbonates (Developments in sedimentology). Elsevier Science

Alonso-Zarza, A.M.  & Tanner, L.H. (2009). Carbonates in continental settings, volume 61: Facies, environments, and processes (Developments in sedimentology). Elsevier Science.

Schlager, W. (1992). Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of reefs and carbonate platforms: A short course (AAPG continuing education course note). American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

 

GLGY 607: Clastic Sedimentology

The course discusses processes of erosion, transport and deposition of sediments by water and wind. Sedimentary fluid dynamics are related to sedimentary bed forms which, in turn, are related to the lamination and bedding styles that characterize most sandstone. The processes of sediment gravity flows are related to the textures of their products and to the forms of their depositional units. Alluvial, deltaic, coastal, shallow-marine, slope, deep-marine and aeolian settings are all discussed in terms of processes, facies and facies organization. Particular attention is given to the principles by which depositional settings are interpreted using both outcrop and sub-surface data. 

 

Reading list

Barwis, J.H. (1990). Sandstone petroleum reservoir. Berlin:Springer-Verlag.

Berg, R.R. (1986). Reservoir sandstones. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Leeder, M.R. (2011). Sedimentology and sedimentary basins: From turbulence to tectonics. Wiley-Blackwell

Leggett, J.K. (1987). Marine clastic sedimentology: Concepts and case studies. Springer.

Okada, H., Kenyon-Smith Jr., A. & Dott, R. (2005). The evolution of clastic sedimentology. Dunedin Academic Press Ltd.

Zimmerle, W. (1995). Petroleum sedimentology. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

 

GLGY 608: Palynology

This course concerns palynology and its application to palaeoenvironmental reconstruction and hydrocarbon exploration. It first considers the morphology, classification, biology, ecology, palaeoecology, biostratigraphy and evolutionary history of the following group of palynomorphs: (a) dinoflagellates (b) acritarchs (c) chitinozoans. It then considers the morphology, dispersal, deposition and preservation, classification, and evolution of fossil spore and pollen and their applications in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction, climate change studies, archaeological investigations and hydrocarbon exploration. Practical sessions involve sample preparation and microscopic study of palynomorphs from the sedimentary basins of Ghana.

 

Reading list

Head, B. (2005). The palynology and micropalaeontology of boundaries (No. 230). Geological Society of London.

Jansonius, J. & Mcgregor, D.C. (2002). Palynology: Principles and applications. AASP - The Palynological Society

Krzywinski, K., Faegri, K., Iversen, J. & Kaland, P.E. (2000). Textbook of pollen analysis. The Blackburn Press.

Nair, P.K. (1985). Essentials of palynology. Scholarly Publications.

Williams, G.L. & Barss, M.S. (1973). Palynology and nannofossil processing techniques (Geological Survey of Canada paper 73-26). Geological Survey of Canada.

 

GLGY 609: Advanced Stratigraphy

This course is divided into two sections: Lithostratigraphy and Biostratography. The Lithostratigraphy section begins with the study of stratigraphic principles by discussing the nature of lithostratigraphic units and the various types of contacts that separate these units. It then considers the concepts of sedimentary facies and depostional sequences. Finally the nomenclature, classification and correlation of lithostratigraphic units are considered. The Biostratigraphy section begins by examining the concept that fossil constitute a valid basis for stratigraphic subdivision. Next, organic evolution and the distribution of organisms in both time and space are explored. Finally the important role that biostratigraphy plays in correlation of stratigraphic units is discussed.

 

Reading list

BouDagher-Fadel, M.K. (2012). Biostratigraphic and geological significance of planktonic foraminifera, volume 22 (Developments in palaeontology). Elsevier.

Coe, A.L., Bosence, D.W.J., Church, K.D. and Flint, S.S. (2003). The sedimentary record of sea-level change. Cambridge University Press.

Doyle, P. & Bennett, M.R. (Eds) (1998). Unlocking the stratigraphical record: Advances in modern stratigraphy. Wiley.

Gregory, F.J. (2008). Key issues in petroleum geology - stratigraphy (Key issues in Earth Sciences). The Geological Society of London.

Head, B. (2005). The palynology and micropalaeontology of boundaries (No. 230). Geological Society of London.

Miall, A.D. (2010). The geology of stratigraphic sequences. Berlin: Springer-Verlag.

Walliser, O.H. (Ed.) (2012). Global events and event stratigraphy in the Phanerozoic: Results of the international interdisciplinary cooperation in the IGCP-Project 216 "Global Biological Events in Earth History”. Springer

 

GLGY 610: Analytical Techniques in Geology

This course is designed to train students in a wide variety of techniques commonly used to collect standard types of data used in geological research. These techniques include x-ray diffraction; x-ray fluorescence; atomic absorption spectrophotometry; neutron activation analysis, scanned electron microscope, etc. Sampling methodologies for rocks, soils, stream sediments, water and biogeochemical samples is also covered. The course will also provide an overview of statistical tests and parameters used in the testing and quantitative evaluation of analytical data. Lectures will be given on the theory of the techniques used and on data quality and interpretation.

 

Reading List

Crompton, T. R.  (1993). The analysis of natural waters: volume 2: Direct preconcentration techniques (Oxford Science Publications). Oxford University Press.

Gill, R. (1997). Modern analytical geochemistry: An introduction to quantitative chemical analysis techniques for earth, environmental and materials scientists. Routledge

Lewis, D. W. & McConchie, D. (1994). Analytical sedimentology. Springer

Marfunin, A. S. (Ed.) (1995). Advanced mineralogy: volume 2: Methods and instrumentations: Results and recent developments (Vol 2). Springer.

Tsuji, K., Injuk, J & Grieken, R. V. (2004). X-Ray spectrometry: Recent technological Advances. Wiley

Wilson, M. A. (1987). N M R Techniques and applications in geochemistry and soil chemistry. Pergamon Pr.

 

GLGY 611: Advanced Structural Geology

This course covers the mechanisms of crustal deformation applied to geological structures and mineral deposits. It will focus on terrane analysis and structural controls on the localization and genesis of mineral deposits. The course also covers advanced topics such as orthorhombic faults, applied structural interpretation of geophysical data, and digital measurement, visualization and analysis of structural data. It will examine regional and local structural controls using the lode gold deposits of the Birimian greenstone belts as a case study. The course includes a field study to the Birimian Greenstone belts, to undertake mine-scale to regional mapping and interpretation exercises.

 

Reading List

Compton, R.R. (1985). Geology in the field. Wiley

Davis, G.H. & Reynolds, S.J. (1996). Structural geology of rocks and regions, Wiley.

Ramsay, J.G. & Huber, M.I.  (2001). The techniques of modern structural geology, vol 3: Applications of continuum mechanics in structural geology. Academic Press.

Ramsay, J.G. & Huber, M.I. (1984). The techniques of modern structural geology, vol 1: strain analysis. Academic Press.

Ramsay, J.G. & Huber, M.I. (1987). The techniques of modern structural geology, vol 2: Folds and fractures. Academic Press.

 

GLGY 613: Clay Mineralogy

This course demonstrates in a practical way how clay minerals can be identified and characterized using the analytical techniques of XRD, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and SEM. Students will understand the nature, properties, behaviour and occurrence of clays in the context of hydrocarbon exploration and production. Course content include: Chemistry and Mineralogy of Clay minerals; Geology of Clays; Principles of XRD, IR and SEM; Preparation of Clays for XRD Analysis; Measurement and Analysis of Clay XRD Patterns; Particle Size, Surface Area and Morphology of Clays; Clay Minerals and Drilling Fluids; Clay Analysis and Assessment of Formation Damage by SEM; Clay Mineralogy and Shale Instability; Clay Mineralogy and Reservoir Quality.

 

Reading List

Lewis, D.W. & McConchie, D. (1994). Analytical sedimentology. Springer

Marfunin, A.S. (Ed.) (1995). Advanced mineralogy: volume 2: Methods and instrumentations: Results and recent developments (vol 2). Springer

Moore, D.M. & Reynolds, R.C. (1997). X-Ray Diffraction and the identification and analysis of clay minerals. USA: Oxford University Press

Repacholi, M.H. (1994). Clay mineralogy: Spectroscopic and chemical determinative methods. Springer

Tsuji, K., Injuk, J & Grieken, R.V. (2004). X-Ray spectrometry: Recent technological advances. Wiley

Velde, B. (1992). Introduction to clay minerals: Chemistry. Springer

Velde, B. (2010). Origin and mineralogy of clays: Clays and the environment. Springer

 

GLGY 615: Advanced Micropalaeontology

Micropaleontology is concerned with microfossils and nanofossils (the latter being smaller than 50 µm). The course involves the study of morphology, classification, biology, and evolutionary history of the following group of microfossils: Foraminfera, Calcareous nannofossils, Ostracods, Conodonts, Diatoms. The course also covers micropalaeontological techniques: processing and microscopy and the application of these microfossils in the fields of oil exploration, biostratigraphy, palaeobiology,  paleoclimatology and paleoenvironments is essential.

 

Reading list

Bignot, G.  (1995). Elements of micropalaeontology. The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Haq, B. U. & Boesma, A. (1981). Introducation to marine micropalaeontolgy. The Netherlands: Elsevier Science.

Jenkins, D. G. (1993). Applied micropalaeontology. The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Journal of Micropalaeontology. The Micropalaeontological Society.  

Lipps. J. H. (1993).  Fosssil prokaryotes and protist. London: Blackwell Scientific Publications.

 

MPHIL PROGRAMMES

Programme

Mode of Study

Tier

A Good degree in

MPhil in Geology

Full time

3

Earth Sciences

MPhil in Engineering Geology

Full time

3

Earth Sciences, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics

MPhil in Hydrogeology

Full time

3

Earth Sciences, Physical Sciences

MPhil in Applied Geochemistry

Full time

3

Earth Sciences, Chemistry

MPhil in Applied Geophysics

Full time

3

Earth Sciences, Physics

MPhil in Economic Geology

Full time

3

Earth Sciences, Physical Sciences

 

 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Admission to MPhil programmes in the Earth Science shall be a good MSc degree in the relevant field. However, MSc students in the Department who have completed the required coursework component with a minimum cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 and wish to transfer directly to the MPhil programme in same field may be considered.

 

DURATION OF PROGRAMME

The duration for the completion of MPhil degree shall normally be one year for full-time students and two years for part-time students.

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

The following are the credits that a registered student is required to earn in order to graduate:

Seminar                                               6   Credits

Thesis                                                  30 Credits

Total                                                   36 Credits

 

EASC 660: Thesis

A thesis describing original and independent research by the candidate is required for the MPhil degree. The thesis format must comply with the guidelines for preparing graduate dissertations and theses in the Graduate Handbook. The dissertation must be successfully defended in an oral examination before an examination committee.

 

EASC 670: Seminar II

Students will present research proposal seminar. In addition, students will present seminars on advanced topics of current interest in their area of interest and attend departmental seminars, and attend and participate in internal and external conferences and workshops.

 

EASC 680: Seminar III

Students will do oral presentations on (i) research progress, and (ii) research results.

 

 

STAFFING

The Department has 19 full-time and 8 part-time faculty members, supported by 13 non-teaching staff. Faculty members provide a wide range of diversified teaching and research disciplines across the geosciences not available at many other institutions in the country. The faculty maintains very good and flexible contact hours with students for consultation and informal contacts, with students particularly benefiting from a small student to faculty ratio at the senior undergraduate and graduate levels. Guest lecturers from industry, particularly oil and gas, and mineral exploration/mining, assist in the delivery of courses.

 

Faculty Members

Name

Highest Qualification

Rank

Status

Asiedu, D. K.

PhD

Professor

Full time

Banoeng-Yakubo, B. K.

PhD

Professor

Full time

Atta-Peters, D.

PhD

Associate Professor

Full-time

Akabzaa, T. M.

PhD

Associate Professor

Full time

Nude, P. M.

PhD

Associate Professor

Full time

Nyame, F. K.

PhD

Associate Professor

Full time

Manu, J.

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Full time

Hayford, E. K.

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Full time

Armah, T. E. K.

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Full time

Yidana, M. S.

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Full time

Akoto, M. A.

MPhil

Senior Lecturer

Full time

Sakyi, P. A.

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Full time

Kutu, J. M.

PhD

Lecturer

Full time

Anani, C. Y.

PhD

Lecturer

Full time

Chegbeleh, L. P.

PhD

Lecturer

Full time

Achampong, F.

PhD

Lecturer

Full time

Osae, S.

PhD

Associate Professor

Part-time

Dampare, S. B.

PhD

Associate Professor

Part-time

Boamah, D.

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Part time

Amponsah, Paulina E.

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Part-time

Afenu, R

MSc

Lecturer

Part-time

Apesegah, E.

MSc

Lecturer

Part-time

James, C.K.

MTech

Lecturer

Part-time

Aryeetey, M. N. A.

MSc

Lecturer

Part-time

 

 

RESOURCES

Physical Facilities

ITEM

QUANTITY

Lecture rooms

3

Teaching Laboratory

1

Library

1

Computer laboratory

2

Museum

1

Equipment room

2

Sample preparation laboratory

1

Expansion of offices, lectures room, laboratories, etc, underway. Expected to be completed and resourced by August 2014

 

Teaching Resources

ITEM

QUANTITY

LCD projectors and screens

3

Laptop Computers

3

White Boards

3

Overhead projector

2

Computer printers

3

Plotter

1

Computer Scanners

3

Desktop Computers

28

Computer Softwares

several

Internet Connectivity

Fixed and wireless connectivity to all offices and lecture halls

Tracing Board (electric)

8

 

 

Scientific Equipments

ITEMS

QUANTITY

Stereoscopes

22

Petrographic Microscope

26

Sieve Vibrator/shaker

2

Centrifuge

1

Chemical Balance

1

Grounding Machine

1

Cutting Machine

1

Hot plate

1

ABEM SAS4000 Terrameter

1

Hach DR2010 pectrophotometer

1

Hach Chloride test kit

1

WTW Conductivity meter LF 340

1

WTW Multiline P4 SET

1

Compbell CR 10X datalogger

3

Conductivity and temperature probe

3

 

Field Vehicles

ITEM

QUANTITY

4X4 cross-country vehicles

3

28-seater bus

1

60-seater bus

1

 

 Linkages with other Departments/Organizations/Institutions

INSTITUTION

TYPE OF SUPPORT TO PROGRAMME

Ghana Geological Survey Department

Provides XRF and other facilities including Engineering Geology laboratory, GIS laboratory, for practical work. Provide resource materials for teaching/ project work. Involved in the supervision of project work.

Minerals Commission

Provide resource materials for teaching/ project work. Involved in the supervision of project work.

Ghana Atomic Energy Commission

Provides the following for practical work: NAA, AAS, Ion Chromatograph, Flame Photometer, Laboratory for sample preparation, etc. Involved in the supervision of project work.

Ghana National Petroleum Company

Provides analytical laboratory for practical work. Provide personnel for guest lectures. Involved in the supervision of project work.

Ghana Institution of Geoscientists

Provides personnel for guest lectures

Schlumberger International

Provision of petroleum Geoscience softwares, and software training. Also provides resource materials

Halliburton International

Provision of workstations. Petroleum geosciences softwares and training

Newmont Ghana Ltd

Provides personnel for guest lectures

Department of Physics, UG

XRD

Department of Earth Sciences, University of Aberdeen

Training and research in Petroleum Geoscience