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MA TRANSLATION

A TWO-LANGUAGE PROGRAMME

 

FACULTY (2015)

Dr. C. K. M. Badasu   (Full time)

Dr. R Yennah              (Full time)

Dr. J. Boampong         (Full time)

Mr. E. K. Kuto            (Full time)

Mr. J. Asunka              (Full time)

Mr. L. Adra                 (Full time)

Dr. S. Syme                 (Part time)

 

CONTENT OF THE PROGRAMME

A fifteen-month programme spanning two semesters and consisting of course work, involving practical exercises, examinations and at least six weeks of internship and a translation project of about 10,000 words.

 

LANGUAGES USED IN THE PROGRAMME

Languages used in the programme will be English and any one of the following:

Arabic, French, Russian, Spanish, Swahili.

 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

1. A good first degree in any one of the five languages apart from English used in the programme: Arabic, French, Russian, Spanish or Swahili, and a high level of proficiency in English; or

2. A good first degree in English and a high level of proficiency in any one of the five other languages.

3. Any other qualification relevant to the programme may also be considered.

 

In addition, all candidates will be expected to show proof of a high level of proficiency in English and any one of the five languages used in the programme before they are considered for admission.

 

CREDITS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION

Course Work                                       46  credits

Internship & Translation Project          6  credits

TOTAL           52  credits

 

YEAR-LONG COURSES

CODE

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

TRAN 600

Research Methodology

4

TRAN 640

Translation from English into Language B*

3

TRAN 650

Translation from Language B into English

3

TRAN 660

Internship and Translation Project

6

 

FIRST SEMESTER COURSES

CODE

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

TRAN 601

Area Studies in Language B

3

TRAN 603

Theory of Translation

3

TRAN 605

Written Communication Skills in English

3

TRAN 607

Written Communication Skills in Language B

3

TRAN 617

On-sight Translation (from English into Language B)

3

TRAN 619

On-sight Translation (from Language B into English)

3

TRAN 621

Terminology Management and Computer Skills for Translators

 

3

 

SECOND SEMESTER COURSES

CODE

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

TRAN 602

Specialized Translation I from English into Language B)

3

TRAN 604

Specialized Translation II from Language B into English

3

TRAN 618

Introduction to Interpreting

3

TRAN 622

Translation Workshop

3

TRAN 624

Seminar

3

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

TRAN 600: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

The aim of this course is to equip students with skills in Research Methodology, ranging from the formulation of a research topic through data collection, drafting, to the material presentation and submission of the thesis.  For the peculiar case of Translation, emphasis will be laid on research tools, including translation software, literature review of published works in Translation.  In other words, issues regarding what to research on, where and how the research is undertaken will all be tied to the subject matter of Translation.

 

Reading List

Beasell, R. B. (2004). Advanced research methodology : an annotated guide to sources. Issy-les-Moulineaux : ESTEM,

Dubois M. J-M. (2005). La rédaction scientifique. Mémoires et thèses : formes régulières et par articles. AUF. Edition ESTEM. De Boeck Diffusion. Issy-Les-Moulineaux.

Fortin, M. F. (2006). Fondement et étapes du processus de recherche. Montréal : Chenelière éducation.

Gibaldi, J. (2003). MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 6th Edition, NY,

Guidere, M. (2004). Méthodologie de la recherche. Paris. Nouvelle Edition. Ellipse,

Williams, J. & Chesterman, A. (2002). The map: a beginner’s guide to doing research in translation studies. Manchester: St Jerome

 

TRAN 601: AREA STUDIES IN LANGUAGE B

In this course, specialized texts in language B will be studied to enable students acquire technical vocabulary in various disciplines: Science, Technology, Medicine, Tourism, Commerce, Law, etc.  No translation will be done in this course; it will serve as a preparatory course for the real task of specialized translation. A large variety of carefully selected specialized texts from very current magazines, journals, periodicals and similar publications will be used to enable students familiarize themselves with the various fields.

 

Reading List

The Economist Magazine, Time Magazine, Wall Street Journal, Newsweek Magazine, Nature, Jeune Afrique Magazine, Le Monde, Le mode Diplomatique, Daily Graphic, CNN, BBC, RFI, Aljazeera, etc

 

TRAN 602: SPECIALIZED TRANSLATION I FROM ENGLISH INTO

                     LANGUAGE B

In this course, students will be trained to translate from English into Language B texts of very specialized nature similar to those they are likely to be required to translate for their clients in professional life.  These texts will be in such areas as Economics, Law, Science, Medicine, Tourism, Transportation, Technology, Journalism etc.  The mastery of translation of such texts will enable students to improve upon their vocabulary and expressions in these areas and thus equip them for the demands of the profession.

 

Reading List

Carpintero, S. N. & Moreda, R. (1995). Interaction between Translation and Comprehension in Scientific and Technical Texts. Madrid: Editorial Complutense.

Cary, E. (2005). Comment faut-il traduire les textes techniques? Lille: Presses Universitaires de Lille.

Díaz, P. P. (1988). Los problemas de la traducción científico-técnica. Ciudad Real: Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha.

Durieux, Ch. (2006). Fondement didactique de la traduction technique. Paris : Didier.

Vinay, J. & Darbelnet, J. (2004). Stylistique comparée du français et de l’anglais, nouvelle édition revue et corrigé. Montréal : Beauchemin.

 

TRAN 603: THEORY OF TRANSLATION

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the dominant theories of Translation.  Students will become familiar with these theories and their ramifications especially in modern day translation practices.  Since Translation Theory emerged out of the practice of the art of translation, these theories will equip students with some of the basic tools they will need in the practice of their profession.

 

Reading List

Catford, J.C. (2007). A Linguistic Theory of Translation: An Essay in Applied Linguistics.

Fawcett, P. (2006). Translation and Language: Linguistic Theories Explained. Manchester: St. Jerome Publishing.

Lederer, M. (1994): La Traduction aujourd’hui: Le Modéle interprétatif Paris: Hachette Education, London: Oxford University Press.

Munday, J. (2008). Introducing translation studies. Theories and applications. Second edition. London/New York: Routledge

Plassard, F.  (2007). Lire pour traduire. Paris: Presses de Sorbonne Nouvelle.

Pym, A. (2010). Exploring translation theories. London/New York: Routledge.

Seleskovitch, D. & Lederer, M. (2001). Interpréter pour traduire, Paris, Didier, coll. Érudition.

 

TRAN 604: SPECIALIZED TRANSLATION II FROM LANGUAGE B INTO

                     ENGLISH

In this course, students will be trained to translate from Language B into English texts of very specialized nature similar to those they are likely to be required to translate for their clients in professional life.  These texts will be in the same areas as those listed from TRAN 602. The mastery of translation of such texts will enable students to improve upon their vocabulary and expressions in these areas and thus equip them for the demands of the profession.

 

Reading List

Bédard, C. (2006).La traduction technique: principes et pratique. Montreal: Linguatech.

Congost M. N. (2004). Problemas de la traduccíon técnica: Los textos medicos en ingles. Alicante: Publicaciones de la Universidad de Alicante.

Maillot, J. (1981). La traduction scientifique et technique. Paris: Technique et Documentation.

Rosenhaus, J. et al. (1996). Future and Communication: The Role of Scientific and Technical Communication and Translation in Technology Development and Transfer. Bethesde: International Scholars Publication.

Steiner, G. (2005).  Après Babel : Une poétique du dire et de la traduction. Paris: Albin Michel.

 

TRAN 605: WRITTEN COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN ENGLISH

The aim of the course is to improve the students’ mastery of English. Students will be required to undertake an in-depth study of texts in this language and to demonstrate their understanding of these texts in various ways, including the following: exercises in rewriting, summarizing, comprehension, composition, lexical, grammatical, and stylistic studies.  No translation will be done in this course, which is designed as a preparation for translation itself.  As the students’ writing skills improve through these various exercises, they will better appreciate the requirements for translating a text.

 

Reading List

Edwards, V. (2004). Multilingualism in the English-speaking World: Pedigree of Nations. London: Blackwell Publishing.

Garzone, G. & I. Cornelia. (eds.) (2007). The Use of English in Institutional and Business Settings: An Intercultural Perspective. New York: Peter Lang.

Kortmann, B. & Edgar, S. (2004). (eds.). A Handbook of English. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Leech G. & Svartik, J. (2003). A Communicative Grammar of English. London: Pearson.

Steiner, G. (2005).  Après Babel : Une poétique du dire et de la traduction. Paris: Albin Michel.

 

 

 

TRAN 607: WRITTEN COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN LANGUAGE B

The aim of the course is to improve the students’ mastery of Arabic, French, Russian, Spanish, or Swahili. Students will be required to undertake an in-depth study of texts in this language and to demonstrate their understanding of these texts in various ways, including the following: exercises in rewriting, summarizing, comprehension, composition, lexical, grammatical, and stylistic studies.  No translation will be done in this course, which is designed as a preparation for translation itself.  As the students’ writing skills improve through these various exercises, they will better appreciate the requirements for translating a text.

 

Reading List

Akmajian, A., Demers, R. A., Farmer, A. K., Harnish, R. M. (2004). Linguistics: An Introduction to Language and Communication. Cambridge, USA: MIT Press.

Ashton, E. O. (1944). Swahili Grammar, Including Intonation. London: Longmans.

Gervais, D. & Sinaiko, H. W. (eds). (1976). Language interpretation and communication. New York/London:Plenum Press.

Seguinot, C. (1994). Technical writing and Translation: Changing with the Times, Journal of Technical Writing and Communication. Bethesde: International Scholars Publication.

Kortmann, B. & Edgar, S. (2004). (eds.). A Handbook of English. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter

 

TRAN 617: ON-SIGHT TRANSLATION FROM ENGLISH INTO LANGUAGE B

This course is designed to train students to orally translate texts spontaneously from English into Language B, without using dictionaries.  As students develop the ability to translate texts without preparing them in advance, they will acquire the basic skills which will prepare them for the Introduction to Interpreting course in the second semester.

 

Reading List

Ersozlu, E. Training of Interpreters: Some Suggestions on Sight Translation Teaching. (http://accurapid.com/journal).

Falbo, C. (1995). Interprétation consécutive et exercices préparatoires. The Interpreters' Newsletter no. 6, 87-91.

Gile, D. (1995). Basic Concepts and Models For Interpreter and Translator Training. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Molina, L. & Hurtado A. A. 2002. “Translation techniques revisited. A dynamic and functional approach.” Meta 47 (4): 498–512.  TSB

Viaggio, S. (1995). The praise of sight translation (and squeezing the last drop thereout of).

 

TRAN 618: INTRODUCTION TO INTERPRETING

The aim of this course is to give students some preliminary training in Consecutive and Simultaneous Interpreting, which they may pursue fully in a professional school.  With this training, students will be able to do some Liaison Interpreting, if they are so pre-disposed and possess the flair for it.

 

Reading List

Curvers, P., Klein, J., Riva, N. & Wuilmart, C. (1986). La traduction à vue comme exercice préparatoire et complémentaire à l'interprétation de conférence. Cuadernos de Traducció e Interpretació no. 7, 97-116.

Falbo, C. (1995). Interprétation consécutive et exercices préparatoires. The Interpreters' Newsletter no. 6, 87-91.

Gaiba, F. (1998). The Origins of Simultaneous Interpretation. The Nuremberg Trial. Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press.

Gile, D. (1995). Basic Concepts and Models For Interpreter and Translator Training. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Gile, D. (2005). Regards sur la recherche en interprétation de conférence. Lille: Presses Universitaires de Lille.

Roderick, J. (2002).Conference Interpreting explained. London: St. Jerome Publishing.

 

TRAN 619: ON-SIGHT TRANSLATION FROM LANGUAGE B INTO ENGLISH

This course is designed to train students to orally translate texts spontaneously from language B into English, without using dictionaries.  As students develop the ability to translate texts without preparing them in advance, they will acquire the basic skills which will prepare them for the Introduction to Interpreting course in the second semester.

 

Reading List

Delisle, J. (1982). L'Analyse du discours comme méthode de traduction. Canada: l'Université d'Ottawa. 

Ersozlu, E. Training of Interpreters: Some Suggestions on Sight Translation Teaching. (http://accurapid.com/journal).

Falbo, C. (1995). Interprétation consécutive et exercices préparatoires. The Interpreters' Newsletter no. 6, 87-91.

Gile, D. (1995). Basic Concepts and Models For Interpreter and Translator Training. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Molina, L. & Hurtado A. A. (2002). “Translation techniques revisited. A dynamic and functional approach.” Meta 47 (4): 498–512.  TSB

Spilka, I. (1966). La traduction а vue: instrument de formation. Meta 11 (2), 42-45.

Viaggio, S. (1995). The praise of sight translation (and squeezing the last drop thereout of).

 

TRAN 621: TERMINOLOGY MANAGEMENT AND COMPUTER SKILLS FOR

                     TRANSLATORS

In this course, students will be trained in the creation of terminology databases using translation software such as TRADOS, SYSTRAN etc.  By doing practical exercises, students will acquire the techniques of searching for and compiling all the terms related to various topics from specific domains, providing their word classes, making out their super-ordinate and subordinate concepts, determining their usage and meanings in context and matching them  against their second language counterparts.  Students will also acquire the computer skills that a modern-day translator would need for efficient work.  They will be trained in the use of translation-related search engines and the use of on-line dictionaries and on-line data transfer.

 

Reading List

Abdallah, H. (2002). A Dictionary of International Relations & Conference Terminology.  Beirut: Librairie du Liban.

Chan Sin-wai. (2004). A Dictionary of Translation Technology.. Chinese University Press,

Keitula V. V. (2000). The Translation of International Lexis. Moscow: International Relations.

Khurshid, A. & Rogers, M. (eds). (2007). Evidence-based. LSP: Translation, Text and Terminology. Bern: Peter Lang.

Reichling, A. (1998). Sytèmes d’information multilingues au service du traducteur. Terminologies Nouvelles, 18, pp. 15-18.

Rosenhaus, J., Gitay, Y., Porush, D. (1996). Future and Communication: The Role of Scientific and Technical Communication and Translation in Technology Development and Transfer. Bethesde: International Scholars Publication.

Sager, J. C. (2007). The Translator as Terminologist. Amsterdam/Filadelfia: John Benjamins

 

TRAN 622 TRANSLATION WORKSHOP

Based exclusively on group work, this course provides a forum for in-depth study and analysis of translation problems from the perspective of students. Students will select current texts from their areas of interest which they will translate within the framework of any dominant translation theories of their choice (Interpretative Theory of Translation, Skopos Theory, etc). Successive groups of students will take turns presenting their translations for peer review. They will explain and justify their translation choices.

 

Reading List

Chesterman, A. (2005). “Problems with strategies”, in New Trends in Translation Studies. In honour of K.Klaudy, Károly A. & Àgota Fóris (eds), 17–28. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó.

Garre, M. (1999). Human Rights in Translation: Legal Concepts in Different Languages. Copenhagen Business School Press

Gerloff, P. A. (1988). From French to English: A look at the translation process in students, bilinguals, and professional translators. Mimeo: Harvard University.

Molina, L. & Hurtado, A. A. (2002). Translation techniques revisited. A dynamic and functional approach. Meta 47 (4): 498–512.

Grass, T., Humbley, J., Vaxelaire, J-L. (2006) : La traduction des noms propres, vol. 51, n°4 de la revue Meta, Presses de l’Université de Montréal.

Uvarov, O. (1988). Technical Translation – Pitfalls and Problems. Picken. 90-98

http://www.erudit.org/revue/meta/2006/v51/n4/index.html

 

TRAN 624: SEMINAR

Students shall present one seminar, based on their reading of texts on translation studies, in the second semester when they would have identified an appropriate text for translation. They will then present detailed proposals for their work in a format specified by programme handlers at the beginning of the semester. It is expected that inputs and critiques made at the seminar will guide students in drawing a clear and coherent roadmap, informed by a substantial literature review, for their Translation Project.

 

Reading List

Chesterman, A. (2005). “Problems with strategies”, in New Trends in Translation Studies. In honour of K.Klaudy, Károly A. & Àgota Fóris (eds), 17–28. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó.  

Gambier, Y. (2009). “Stratégies et tactiques en traduction et interprétation”, in Efforts and Models in Interpreting and Translation Research, Gyde Hansen, Heidrun Gerzymisch-Arbogast & A. Chesterman (eds), 63–82. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: J. Benjamins.  

Jääskeläinen, R. (1993). “Investigating translation strategies”, in Recent Trends in Empirical Translation Research, Sonja Tirkkonen-Condit & John Laffling (eds), 99–120. Joensuu: University of Joensuu.  

Lörscher, W. (1991). Translation Performance, Translation Process and Translation Strategies. A Psycholinguistic Investigation. Tübingen: Narr.  

Molina, L & Hurtado, A. A. (2002). “Translation techniques revisited. A dynamic and functional approach.” Meta 47 (4): 498–512.  

Newmark, P. 1995 (1988). A textbook of Translation. London: Prentice Hall.  

Nord, C. (1991). Text Analysis in Translation. Theory, Methodology, and Didactic Application of a Model for Translation-oriented Text Analysis. Amsterdam & Atlanta: Rodopi.

 

TRAN 640: TRANSLATION FROM ENGLISH INTO LANGUAGE B

The aim of this course, in the first semester, is to expose students to the translation of semi-specialized texts from English into Language B.  This will help the students to increase their mastery of the languages and also prepare them for the more demanding courses in Specialized Translation.  During the second semester, more specialized texts will be handled in the course.  It will thus supplement what is done in the Specialized Translation courses.

 

Reading List

Carpintero S, N. & Rubio M. A. L. (1995): Interaction Between Translation and Comprehension in Scientific and Technical Texts, en Martin-Gaitero, R., ED.: V Encuentros complutenses en torno a la traducción. Madrid: Editorial Complutense.

Cary, E. (1985): Comment faut-il traduire les textes techniques?, en Cary, E.: Comment faut-il traduire? Lille: Presses Universitaires, pp. 57-63.

Chuquet, H. & Paillard, M. (1987): Approche linguistique des problèmes de traduction anglais-français. Paris: Ophrys, 1

Citroën, I. J. (1962): Specialization in Technical and Scientific Translation, Babel, 8, 2, pp. 66-71.

Congost Maestre, N. (1994): Problemas de la traduccíon técnica: Los textos medicos en ingles. Alicante: Publicaciones de la Universidad de Alicante.

 

 

 

TRAN 650: TRANSLATION FROM LANGUAGE B INTO ENGLISH

The aim of the course, in the first semester is to expose students to the translation of general and semi-specialized texts from Language B into English.  This will help the students to increase their mastery of the languages and also prepare them for the more demanding courses in Specialized Translation.  During the second semester, more specialized texts will be handled in the course.  It will thus supplement what is done in the Translation courses.

 

Reading List

Carpintero S. N. & Rubio Moreda, A.L. (1995): Interaction Between Translation and Comprehension in Scientific and Technical Texts, en Martin-Gaitero, R., ED.: V Encuentros complutenses en torno a la traducción. Madrid: Editorial Complutense.

Cary, E. (1985): « Comment faut-il traduire les textes techniques? », in Cary, E.: Comment faut-il traduire? Lille: Presses Universitaires, pp. 57-63.

Catford, J.C. (1965). A Linguistic Theory of Translation: An Essay in Applied Linguistics.

Chuquet, H. & Paillard, M. (1987). Approche linguistique des problèmes de traduction anglais-français. Paris : Ophrys, 1

Citroën, I. J. (1962): Specialization in Technical and Scientific Translation, Babel, 8, 2, pp. 66-71.

Congost M., N. (1994). Problemas de la traduccíon técnica: Los textos medicos en ingles. Alicante: Publicaciones de la Universidad de Alicante. London: Oxford University Press,

 

TRAN 660: INTERNSHIP & TRANSLATION PROJECT

This course is designed to train students in translation contract management involving cost, team and quality management as well as client relations. Besides this, students, on completing their course work, will spend 12 weeks in an appropriate agency or organization in order to have direct exposure to professional practice and use the skills acquired during the course. They will, in consultation with their supervisors, choose for translation into their Language A an original specialized text in their Language B.  Students may choose one text of 8,000 words or 2 to 3 texts adding up to 8,000 words. The final document, known as the Translation Project, will consist of an introduction, the original text(s), the translated text(s), a discussion of their translation-related problems & solutions and a glossary. This Translation Project (70%) will be submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of the MA Translation degree.

During the internship, students will choose, in consultation with their supervisors, an authentic document (about 2,000 words) of the Organisation for translation into Language A. The Internship Report will comprise an (i) account of the internship experience, the original and translated documents (20%) and (ii) the host agency/organization’s report (10%) on the student’s performance during the internship. The Internship Report will be submitted separately from the Translation Project to the Supervisor.

 

Reading List

No reading List required

*“Language B” (or LB) refers to the five Modern Languages: Arabic, French, Russian, Spanish and Swahili.