Home

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE PROGRAMME IN EARTH SCIENCE

DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCE

 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE PROGRAMME IN EARTH SCIENCE

 

1.      INTRODUCTION

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Earth Science requires original research in a specific area of Earth Science, demonstration of broad knowledge in the following fields: Geology, Applied Geology, Applied Geophysics and Applied Geochemistry.

The successful candidate must demonstrate a breadth of understanding in Earth Science, as well as a depth of understanding in his or her chosen area(s) of emphasis. Potential students must show an ability to do creative research. This research should be carried out during a significant period of time (i.e. during at least one year or three semesters in residence). Thus, each successful PhD candidate will produce a significant piece of original research, presented in a written dissertation and defended in an oral examination. This work should be of such scope and quality that least one journal article can be derived from it.

Upon successful completion of the programme students will be awarded PhD in Earth Science with any one of the following options, depending on thesis area: Geology, Applied Geology, Applied Geophysics and Applied Geochemistry

2.      ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Admission to PhD programme in the Earth Science shall be a good Master’s degree (i.e., MPhil or MSc) in the relevant field. However, candidates with a good first degree may also apply. Such first degree holders shall take Level 600 courses in the first year. On completion of the Level 600 courses, they will be assessed, and may progress into PhD depending on performance.

3.      DURATION OF PROGRAMME

The duration for the completion of PhD degree shall normally be four years for full-time master degree entrants and six years for part-time master degree entrants.

 

4.      REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

The following are the credits that a registered student is required to earn in order to graduate:

Coursework                                         18-24 Credits

Seminars                                              12   Credits

Thesis/Dissertation                              45 Credits

Total                                                   75-81 Credits

5.      STRUCTURE OF PROGRAMME

Code

Title

Credits

Year 1

Semester 1

Core

FASC 701

Science and Society

3

Select one course related to your area of specialization

EASC 701

Recent Advances in Geology

3

EASC 703

Recent Advances in Geochemistry

3

EASC 705

Recent Advances in Geophysics

3

EASC 707

Recent Advances in Applied Geology

3

Electives (select 3 – 6 credits)

FASC 700

Special Topics in Science

3

MASC 709

Advances in Marine Geoscience

3

Depending on background in Earth Science, students may be required to take up to three credit courses from Level 600.

Semester 2

Core

FASC 702

Advanced Quantitative Research Methods

3

EASC 702

Analytical Methods and Data Analysis in the Earth Sciences

3

EASC 704

Independent Study in Earth Science

3

Electives (select up to 3 credits)

FASC 710

Teaching of Science in a Tertiary Institution

3

MASC 702

Current Trends in Remote Sensing and GIS Applications

3

Depending on background in Earth Science, students may be required to take up to three credit courses from Level 600.

Year 2

EASC 710

Seminar I

3

EASC 720

Seminar II

3

Year 3

EASC 730

Seminar III

3

Year 4

EASC 740

Seminar IV

3

EASC 700

Thesis/Dissertation

45

 

 

6.      COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

FASC 700:  Special Topics in Science

The course examines historical and contemporary issues in science, relating to the student’s area of specialization and relevance. Such topics are expected to challenge the students into exploring current and relevant research trends/discoveries in scientific approaches. The course will enable students explore scientific knowledge in modern science, and add on to their depth of information in their chosen areas of specialty. It is expected that, the course will complement other courses on the PhD flagship of the various departments in the Sciences and elsewhere. Additionally, it will expose students to current trends of presentations, and foster stronger confidence-building attitude that will enable enhanced international academic competitive spirit.

FASC 701:  Science and Society

This course will enable students gain insights on the practice of science as a discipline including major scientific concepts like inductivism are examined as well as the history of science and science itself, an overview of current approaches to research and an understanding of research partnerships, networks and appropriate methods of communicating science depending on the audience. The aim of the course is to help students to fit their research to relevant trends and directions for national development. Course content will cover topics such as the basis for the scientific method; conceptual frameworks; the philosophy of science; ethics in research; pure versus applied science debates; approaches to research; science for development and the merit of broader impact criteria; north south/south south collaboration and partnerships; research networks; communicating science to the policy make, lay audience and to the media.

Reading list

Creswell, J. W. (2009). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches (3rd ed.). Lond., UK: Sage Publication.

Curd, M. & Cover, J. A. (1998). Philosophy of science: The central issues. New York, NY: Norton.

Gyekye, K., Osae, E., & Effah, E. (Eds.) (2005). Harnessing research, science and technology for sustainable development in Ghana. Accra, Ghana: National Council on Tertiary Education.

Kendler, H. H. (2003). Should scientists remain objective? Science, 301, 310-311.

Kuhn, T. S. (2012). The structure of scientific revolutions. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

FASC 702: Advanced Quantitative Research Methods

The course will serve as a step up for students who need to add up to their knowledge in quantitative methods of research techniques and analyses.  Topics to be covered include:  Sampling distributions and hypothesis testing. Sample size determination. Categorical data and chi-square, Non parametric tests. Principles of Design of Experiments. Analysis of variance and its assumptions. Experiments with single and multiple factors. Orthogonal and multiple Comparisons. Completely Randomized, Randomized Complete Block, repeated measures, cross over and Latin square designs. Nested designs.  Fixed, random and mixed effects models. Factorial designs. Confounding. Fractional factorial designs. Split plot designs. Incomplete block designs. Analysis of covariance. Regression models: basic concepts; Regression Model Diagnostics. Categorical data analysis. Logistic regression, univariate and multivariate. Confounding and collinearity in logistic regression. Model selection in logistic regression.  

Reading List

Clarke, G.M. & Kempton, R.E. (1997). Introduction to the design and analysis of experiments. Lond., UK: Edward Arnold.

Cochran, W.G. & Cox, G.M. (1957). Experimental design. New York, NY: John Wiley,

Lyman R.O & Longnecker, M. (2001). An introduction to statistical methods and data analysis 5th Edition. California, CA: Duxbury.

Mead, R. (1988). The design of experiments. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Montgomery, D.C. (2000). Design and analysis of experiments. New York, NY: John Wiley.

Sokal, R. R. & Rohlf, F.J. (2012). Biometry: the principles and practice of statistics in biological research. 4th ed. New York, NY: W. H. Freeman and Co.

Stokes, M.E. Davis, C.S. & Koch, G.G. (2000). Categorical data analysis using the SAS system. New York, NY: SAS Publishing.

FASC 720:  Teaching Science at the Tertiary Level

It is anticipated that many of the students who go through the PhD programme in the Sciences may nurse special interest in teaching and academia. Focusing on group discussions, this course is expected to equip students with the requisite knowledge in overall management of students at the tertiary level. The course will focus on teaching the methodologies and techniques in handling Science-teaching at the undergraduate level. Topics such as laboratory supervision and safety, grading issues, special needs students, lecturing and tutoring techniques, examination preparation, teacher/student relationship, tertiary education management, will be discussed through reading, class/group discussions as well as presentations.

Reading list

Alley, M. (2007). The craft of scientific presentations: critical steps to succeed and critical errors to avoid. New York, NY: Springer-Verlag,

Arons A. B. (1996). Teaching introductory physics. New York, NY: John Wiley and Sons.

Halfman, R.L., MacVicar, M.L.A., Martin, W.T., Taylor, E.F., & Zacharias, J.R. (1972). Tactics for change. Occasional Paper No. 11 of the Education Research Center, Massachusetts, MA: Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Morrison, R. T. (1986). The lecture system in teaching science. Undergraduate Education in Chemistry and Physics (website: http://entropysite.oxy.edu)

Polya, G. (1981). Mathematical discovery: on understanding, learning, and teaching problem solving. New York, NY: John Wiley and Sons.

EASC 701: Recent Advances in Geology

This course seeks to provide in-depth reviews in recent advances in basic geology. Areas to be covered include petrology, mineralogy, structural geology; sedimentology; paleontology; petroleum geology, economic geology, and regional geology. The course will be delivered in seminar format. Experts from industry and academia may be invited as guest speakers.

Reading list

Relevant articles from journals such as:

Earth and Planetary Sciences Letters

Earth Science Review

Economic Geology

Journal of Petrology

Journal of Sedimentary Research

Ore Geology Reviews

Precambrian Research

EASC 702: Analytical Methods and Data Analysis in the Earth Sciences

The objective of this course is to provide training in the laboratory analysis of samples and evaluation of the data. Topics to be covered include: instrumental analytical techniques (including appropriate sample preparation), data processing, and data evaluation. On completion of the course the students will develop skills in laboratory work and use a wide range of analytical methods in the laboratory. The students will also be able to demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the different analytical techniques used. In addition, they will be able to critically assess the data and the validity of different methods of analysis for different purposes. As far as possible, training will be in the form of a project work around a suite of data collected at the start of the course.

 

Reading List

Anderson, N.A. (1997). Instrumentation for Process Measurement and Control, Third Editon. CRC Press

Davis, J.C. (1986). Statistics and Data Analysis in Geology. Wiley

Komov, I.L. (1994). Geochemical Methods of Prospecting for Non-metallic Minerals. Brill Academic Publishers.

Lewis, D.W. &  McConchie, D. (1994). Analytical Sedimentology. Springer.

Morris, A.S (2001). Measurement and Instrumentation Principles, Third Edition. Butterworth-Heinemann.

Rollinson, H.R. (1993). Using Geochemical Data: Evaluation, Presentation, Interpretation. Prentice Hall.

Van Loon, J.C. (1988). Analytical Methods for Geochemical Exploration. Academic Press.

EASC 703: Recent Advances in Geochemistry

This course seeks to provide in-depth reviews in recent advances in pure and applied geochemistry. Areas to be covered include distribution and migration of elements in igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; isotope geochemistry; petroleum geochemistry; hydrochemistry, cosmochemistry, soild-earth geochemistry, and exploration geochemistry. The course will be delivered in seminar format. Experts from industry and academia may be invited as guest speakers.

 

Reading list

Relevant articles from journals such as:

   Applied Geochemistry

Chemical Geology

   Exploration Geochemistry

   Geochmica et Cosmochimica Acta

Nature

   Organic Geochemistry

   Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry

Treatise on Geochemistry

EASC 704: Independent Study in Earth Science

The objective of this course is to equip students with the skills of field data collection, analysis and interpretation. Students collect, analyze and interpret specific field data pertaining to their area of specialization. The findings of the study is presented in a report, in a format similar to that of an article submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed earth science journal, and also presented orally. It is expected that on completion of the course the students would have developed practical skills in field work.

Reading List

Assaad, F.A.,  LaMoreaux, J.W., & Hughes, T (Eds.) (2004). Field Methods for Geologists and Hydrogeologists. Springer

Assad, F.A. (2009). Field Methods for Petroleum Geologists: A Guide to Computerized Lithostratigraphic Correlation Charts Case Study: Northern Africa. Springer

Coe, A.L. (Ed.). (2010). Geological Field Techniques. Wiley-Blackwell

Compton, R.R. (1985). Geology in the Field. Wiley

Freeman, T. (1999). Procedures in Field Geology. Wiley-Blackwell

McCoy, R.M. (2004). Field Methods in Remote Sensing. The Guilford Press

Milsom, J.J. & Eriksen, A. (2011). Field Geophysics (Geological Field Guide). Wiley

EASC 705: Recent Advances in Geophysics

This course seeks to provide in-depth reviews in recent advances in pure and applied geophysics. Areas to be covered include petroleum geophysics, exploration geophysics, borehole geophysics, seismology and solid earth geophysics. The course will be delivered in seminar format. Experts from industry and academia may be invited as guest speakers.

Reading list

Relevant articles from journals such as:

Advances in Geophysics

Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America

Exploration Geophysics

Geophysical Journal International

Geophysical Research Letters

Journal of Applied Geophysics

Journal of Geophysical Research

Treatise on Geophysics

EASC 707: Recent Advances in Applied Geology

This course seeks to provide in-depth reviews in recent advances in applied geology. Areas to be covered include environmental geology, engineering geology, geomathematics, hydrogeology and hydrology. The course will be delivered in seminar format. Experts from industry and academia may be invited as guest speakers.

Reading list

Relevant articles from journals such as:

Bulletin of Engineering Geology and the Environment

Computational Geosciences

Environmental Earth Sciences

Environmental Geochemistry and Health

Hydrogeology Journal

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences

Water Resources Research

Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

EASC 710: Seminar 1

This course is a research proposal seminar to be presented by the candidate. The seminar is to be accompanied by a detailed written research proposal. Candidates will also present seminars on advanced topics of current interest in their area of interest and attend departmental seminars.

EASC 720: Seminar II

Candidates will be attached to relevant faculty research or a research laboratory to gain experience in data gathering, analysis and interpretation in their areas of research during the first semester of the second year on the program. At the end of the second semester, each candidate is expected to submit a comprehensive report on the experience and present it orally to faculty and students at the end of the semester.

EASC 730: Seminar III

Candidates will do oral presentation of research progress. In addition, candidates will present seminars on advanced topics of current interest in their area of interest, attend departmental seminars, and attend and participate in internal and external conferences and workshops.

EASC 740: Seminar IV

Candidates will do oral presentation of research findings. In addition, candidates will attend departmental seminars, and attend and participate in internal and external conferences and workshops.

 

 

7.      INTENSHIP/EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROGRAMME

All PhD candidates shall be required to spend the first Semester of the PhD Year 2 in an internship/experiential learning programme. The candidate will be attached to any one of the following:

              i.      industry to acquire industrial experience;

            ii.      ongoing projects in the Department;

          iii.      a Professor to work on specific projects;

          iv.      a scientific laboratory to acquire specific techniques and expertise;

            v.      a partner universities/laboratories to participate in selected programmes/research

FUNDED ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS IN THE DEPARTMENT

 

8.      SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES

Year 1, Semester 1

Course work (9-12 credits). Participate in departmental seminars. Actively think of thesis/dissertation area. Keep abreast of recent scientific literature in field of study. Assignment of Supervisory Committee.

Year 1, Semester 2

Course work (9-12 credits). Participate in departmental seminars. Prepare for comprehensive examination. Select thesis/dissertation area. Keep abreast with scientific literature in thesis/dissertation area.

Year 2, Semester 1

Participate in departmental seminars. Take Comprehensive examination (both oral and written). Actively work on research proposal. Undertake Intenship/Experiential Learning.

Year 2, Semester 2

Present research proposal orally. Participate in departmental seminars. Start dissertation research.

Year 3, Semesters 1 & 2

Continue dissertation research. Oral presentation of research progress. Participate in departmental seminars. Attend and participate in internal and external conferences and workshops. Think actively of developing manuscripts from dissertation.

Year 4, Semesters 1 & 2

Continue with dissertation research. Participate in departmental seminars. Submit at least one manuscript for publication. Complete and defend dissertation. Submit final version of dissertation to Office of the School of Graduate Studies.

 

9.      FACULTY

Name

Highest Qualification

Rank

Status

Asiedu, D. K.

PhD

Professor

Full time

Banoeng-Yakubo, B. K.

PhD

Professor

Full time

Atta-Peters, D.

PhD

Associate Professor

Full-time

Akabzaa, T. M.

PhD

Associate Professor

Full time

Nude, P. M.

PhD

Associate Professor

Full time

Nyame, F. K.

PhD

Associate Professor

Full time

Manu, J.

PhD

Associate Professor

Full time

Yidana, M. S.

PhD

Associate Professor

Full time

Armah, T. E. K.

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Full time

Kutu, J.M.

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Full time

Sakyi, P.A.

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Full time

Anani, C,Y

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Full time

Chegbeleh, L.P.

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Full time

Loh, Y.A.

PhD

Lecturer

Full time

Sapah, M.S.

PhD

Lecturer

Full time

Amponsah, P.

PhD

Lecturer

Full time

Osae, S.

PhD

Associate Professor

Part-time

Dampare, S.B.

PhD

Associate Professor

Part-time

Boamah, D.

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Part time

Amponsah, P. E.

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Part-time

Achampong, F.

PhD

Lecturer

Part time

 

 

  1. COLLABORATION WITH UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG

The Department has been collaborating for some time with School of Geosciences of University of Johannesburg, South Africa (UJ). The nature of the collaboration has been joint supervision of PhD students were students of the Department are jointly supervised by faculty of the two institutions, and students spend some time in laboratories at UJ for the analysis of their samples. Already, two PhDs have benefitted.

 

The Department is in talks with UJ to extend the collaboration to research activities, on which some PhD candidates will be attached, and a joint PhD programme in which students will register at both institutions. The research collaboration will focus on comparative studies of geological settings, especially their respective relationships to mineralization.

 

11       RESOURCES

11.1     Physical Facilities

ITEM

QUANTITY

Lecture rooms

3

Laboratory

1

Library

1

Computer laboratory

2

Museum

1

Equipment room

2

Sample preparation laboratory

1

Expansion of offices, lectures room, laboratories, etc, underway. Expected to be completed and resourced by August 2014

 

11.2     Teaching Resources

ITEM

QUANTITY

LCD projectors and screens

3

Laptop Computers

3

White Boards

3

Overhead projector

2

Computer printers

3

Plotter

1

Computer Scanners

3

Desktop Computers

28

Computer Softwares

several

Internet Connectivity

Fixed and wireless connectivity to all offices and lecture halls

Tracing Board (electric)

8

 

 

11.3     Scientific Equipments

ITEMS

QUANTITY

Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer

1

Liquid Water Isotope Analyzer

1

X-Ray Refractometer, XRF

1

EM 34

1

Stereoscopes

22

2 HP Pedrollo submersible pumps

2

Hydrometric Stations

2

Dip meters

3

Petrographic Microscope

26

Sieve Vibrator/shaker

2

Centrifuge

1

Chemical Balance

1

Grounding Machine

1

Cutting Machine

1

Hot plate

1

ABEM SAS4000 Terrameter

1

Hach DR2010 pectrophotometer

1

Hach Chloride test kit

1

WTW Conductivity meter LF 340

1

WTW Multiline P4 SET

1

Compbell CR 10X datalogger

3

Conductivity and temperature probe

3

 

11.4     Field Vehicles

ITEM

QUANTITY

4X4 cross-country vehicles

3

28-seater bus

1

60-seater bus

1

 

11.5      Linkages with other Departments/Organizations/Institutions

INSTITUTION

TYPE OF SUPPORT TO PROGRAMME

Ghana Geological Survey Department

Provides XRF and other facilities for practical work.

Ghana Atomic Energy Commission

Provides the following for practical work: NAA, AAS, Ion Chromatograph, Flame Photometer, Laboratory for sample preparation, etc.

Ghana National Petroleum Company

Provides analytical laboratory for practical work. Provide personnel for guest lectures

Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland

Collaborating in the areas of skills development on airborne geophysical data processing and interpretation, 3D Geological Modelling, and 3D Hydrological Modelling

Ghana Institution of Geoscientists

Provides personnel for guest lectures

Schlumberger International

Provision of petroleum Geoscience softwares, and software training. Also provides resource materials

Halliburton International

Provision of workstations. Petroleum geosciences softwares and training

Water Resources Commission, WRC

Provides monitoring system for groundwater research in Northern Ghana and critical hydrogeological and hydrological data for student training and research

Water Research Institute

Provides critical hydrological datasets and equipment for student training and staff research work

Newmont Ghana Ltd

Provides personnel for guest lectures

Department of Physics, UG

XRD

Department of Earth Sciences, University of Aberdeen

Training and research in Petroleum Geoscience