Office of Research, Innovation and Development(ORID) Seminar : Poverty Measurement and Analysis

Starting January 6, 2017 - Ending January 6, 2018

INTRODUCTION

Measures of poverty and inequality are used across many research areas for comparisons – such as assessments of whether poverty has increased, or which are the poorest regions in a country – or for studies aiming to determine associations of various outcomes - such as health and educational attainment - with poverty. The meaning and measurement of poverty is however not always so straightforward. How should the concept of “well-being” be defined in deciding who is poor? Where should the poverty line be drawn? What poverty measure should be used?

AIM

The overall aim of the course is to provide participants with a broad understanding of both conceptual and practical issues associated with empirical analysis of poverty, enabling participants to critically assess existing evidence of inequality and poverty and participate in teams working with poverty assessments.

INTENDED LEARNING OBJECTIVES

          At the end of the course the participants should be able to:

  •  Discuss why poverty measurement and analysis is justified
  •  Explain how poverty and inequality can be measured, and the challenges in data sources
  •  Construct and interpret measures of poverty and inequality
  •  Discuss strength and limitations of various measures of poverty and inequality
  •  Discuss determinants of poverty and inequality
  •  Explain how impact on poverty can be assessed
  •  Assess the links between economic growth, inequality and poverty; 

COURSE CONTENTS

The course covers Conceptual measures of poverty and inequality, Poverty lines, Poverty and Inequality measures, Multi-dimensional poverty measurement, Comparison of poverty over time and across countries, Understanding determinants of poverty, Poverty impact evaluation and implications of poverty and inequality for social welfare.

TEACHING METHODOLOGY

Teaching will include lectures with discussion, exercises and group work. Results of group work will be presented in class. The participants are expected to prepare before class. Materials and suggested preparations will be circulated to participants before start of the course.

COURSE COORDINATOR

Dr. Charles Ackah, Senior Research Fellow & Head of Economics Division, Institute of Statistical, Social & Economic Research (ISSER), University of Ghana.

COURSE FACILITATORS

  •   Charles Ackah, Senior Research Fellow & Head of Economics Division, Institute of Statistical, Social & Economic Research (ISSER), University of Ghana.
  •   Ulrika Enemark, Associate Professor, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark.
  •   Robert Osei, Associate Professor, Institute of Statistical, Social & Economic Research (ISSER), and Vice Dean, School of Graduate Studies, University of Ghana.

TIME AND PLACE

Date:         16TH – 18TH JANUARY, 2017

Time:       9.00 AM – 5.00 PM

Venue:    ISSER, UNIVERSITY OF GHANA

 

REGISTRATION

Click this link to register

APPLICATION DEADLINE: JANUARY 10, 2017